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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: April ::
Re: Limes; Hedge-Priest; Martext
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0608  Monday, 5 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Brian Haylett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 19:37:43 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Lines and Limes in The Tempest

[2]     From:   Scott Oldenburg <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 10:07:52 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

[3]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 13:11:05 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

[4]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 22:26:49 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

[5]     From:   Robert Burke SJ <
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        Date:   Friday, 02 Apr 1999 17:20:46 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 19:37:43 +0100
Subject:        Re: Lines and Limes in The Tempest

Ros King writes: 'it certainly wouldn't be my choice as a clothes line.
The twigs tend to grow horizontally or even slightly downwards so
clothes (unless stuck by the aphids) would probably fall off! '

I am no gardener, but I have always bought my wife books on the subject
(with pleasing results). I learn from one of them that the lime is
popular in pleaching, which could provide a suitable structure for
drying purposes - perhaps such as Autolycus stole his sheets from, or
perhaps even Coleridge sat in. Having said that, the citrus lime sounds
more likely, or perhaps the Elizabethans favoured some other species of
the 'tilia' family. Or perhaps there were no aphides in Stratford?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Oldenburg <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 10:07:52 -0700
Subject: 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

I have always assumed that the name "Martext" was a pejorative reference
to Puritans who actually read and interpreted the Bible for themselves
(marring the text).  That would seem to reinforce the Marprelate
connection.

Best,
Scott Oldenburg

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 13:11:05 -0500
Subject: 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

Rubenstein's Dictionary of Shakespeare's Sexual Puns refers to hedge as
"a whoring locale" in its supplement.  Earlier, it refers to
hedgehog/hedgepig as "symbol of sexual bestiality."  Is it too stretchy
to go for "pimp?" After all, it was the best place to find a
"hedge-whore." And nobody wanted to be "hedge-born" (illegitimate).

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 22:26:49 +0100
Subject: 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

>By the way, has anyone noticed a correspondence between  "Martext" and
>Marprelate?  Is there a deeper joke here?
>
>Larry Weiss

Larry Weiss raises an important point here, and one that doesn't seem to
have been dealt with in general commentary on AYLI (at least, I can't
find any mention of the Marprelate controversy in Norton or either the
introduction and notes to the Arden2 [1975]).

Norton assigns AYLI to 1598-1600.  The Marprelate pamplets were in
circulation in 1588-1589, and the object of considerable (now lost)
stage comment.  On the face of it, the consonance between the names
"Martext" and "Marprelate" would suggest some link, and the association
of a Sir (pseudo-noble) Oliver (presented as a hedge-priest) of
presumably Anglican persuasion, with the puritan (and implicitly
lower-class) author of the pamphlets would suggest that the "joke" Larry
is looking for is both thoroughly present and ironic in intent.

There could be a link, also, to 12N (1600?), where we have Shakespeare's
puritan (explicitly so-called) Malvolio, and also the only (?) other
Sir-Priest in the canon, Feste-as-Sir-Thopas, both brought together in
the mad-cell scene.

All in all, Larry Weiss seems to have raised quite a large and
interesting issue here.

Robin Hamilton

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Burke SJ <
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Date:           Friday, 02 Apr 1999 17:20:46 -0600
Subject: 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0595 Re: Hedge-Priest

Having looked at the number of replies, to this query, I would urge
people to look at Brian Friel's "Translations", where you find a
hedge-schoolmaster. Since the English government forbade the Irish to be
educated, those who wished to be had to attend illegal schools,
frequently run by ex-priests, who had been educated in France, then left
the priesthood.  I believe in the "Program Notes" of Friel's play Jimmy
the Greek is so described.
 

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