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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: April ::
Assorted Questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0617  Monday, 5 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 15:31:14 -0500
        Subj:   Animated Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Allan Blackman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 15:41:42 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Puns and Quibbles

[3]     From:   Jack Heller <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 12:02:55 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   A request for advice

[4]     From:   Jeffrey Myers <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 14:32:17 -0500
        Subj:   Nathan Field and the Children of Her Majesty's Revels

[5]     From:   Joanne Walen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 23:29:40 EST
        Subj:   Summer Courses (UK)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 15:31:14 -0500
Subject:        Animated Shakespeare

I discovered a hitherto unknown resource while surfing the channel guide
one evening.  There is a series of animated Shakespeare plays being
broadcast on HBO at unwholesome times, like 6 AM.  I set my VCR to
record a couple (notice, I am not so dedicated as to arise at that hour)
and have now viewed two of them - RIII and AYLI.  As the RIII was rerun
when I next set the machine to record the program, it may be that there
is nothing else yet.

Each program lasts about 30 minutes, and provides the gist of the main
plot of the play, with portions of some of the most famous speeches left
intact.  The animation seems keyed to the genre of play.  Both RIII and
AYLI are in what looks like watercolor, but the RIII was dark and
foreboding while the AYLI was pastel and fuzzier.

Although the series is broadcast in the early morning, the shows do not
seem to have been created for young children.  Language which was once
forbidden is not Bowdlerized, and the AYLI included a sexual situation
involving Touchstone and Audrey.

It appears from the credits that the creators are Asian, but English
authorities, notably Stanley Wells, are listed as advisors.

Does anyone have any other information?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Allan Blackman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Mar 1999 15:41:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Puns and Quibbles

Is a pun distinquishable from a quibble?

Allan Blackman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 12:02:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        A request for advice

Dear List Members:

I posted a question recently in search of a cheap paperback edition of
Beaumont and Fletcher plays. The result of the inquiry is that there
currently is no cheap edition of their plays. So I have two main
questions (which may lead to lots of future smaller ones)?

Question number 1: Would there be a sufficient demand to merit someone
embarking on editing a World Classics-style edition of their plays? I
would think that such an edition should include The Knight of the
Burning Pestle, The Faithful Shepherdess, Philaster, The Maid's Tragedy,
and A King and No King.

Question number 2: How does a person investigate the possibility of
getting that editing task? I am a recent Ph.D., and I am considering my
ongoing professional development. I have a forthcoming book on Thomas
Middleton's comedies (which includes consideration of a few textual
conundrums in his canon), and I intend to do an article on Coriolanus
this summer. I have not done a full-fledged editing project, but of
course, I have had a graduate course on textual editing. (It was my good
fortune to have had the course with the late Josephine Roberts.) So
would editing these plays for wider availability be a worthwhile
pursuit? And could someone give me an idea about the length of time such
an undertaking requires? And am I completely out of mind for thinking
about this?

Jack Heller

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[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeffrey Myers <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 14:32:17 -0500
Subject:        Nathan Field and the Children of Her Majesty's Revels

Why is Nathan Field, who would have been 22 at the time, listed as one
of "the principal comedians" when this company performed Epicoene in
1609?  Isn't that a bit old?  Was the company no longer a children's
company at that point?

Thanks,
Jeff Myers

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Walen <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 Apr 1999 23:29:40 EST
Subject:        Summer Courses (UK)

Can anyone on the list provide me with information on summer courses in
Shakespeare at either Cambridge University or Worcester College for
'99?  Please reply off list.

Thanks,
Joanne Walen
<
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