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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: April ::
Re: Current Views on Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.06631  Wednesday, 14 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 1999
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.06626 Re: Current Views on Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Roger Schmeeckle <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Apr 1999 21:34:58 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.06626 Re: Current Views on Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 1999
Subject: 10.06626 Re: Current Views on Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.06626 Re: Current Views on Shakespeare

>First, what nation might that
>be?  The US, I take it, but if "Shakespeare is for everyone," how about
>those of us not of the US persuasion?

>Karen Peterson-Kranz

As a perhaps-marginally-relevant point, when the play DOUGLAS by John
Home (1722-1808) was performed on the Edinburgh stage in 1756, it was
greeted by the following resonant cry from a member of the audience,
"Whaur's yir Wullie Shakespeare noo?"

Where indeed?

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Schmeeckle <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Apr 1999 21:34:58 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.06626 Re: Current Views on Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.06626 Re: Current Views on Shakespeare

>The humanities bind us
>together as a nation and help us live more meaningful lives.

>Any thoughts?

Yes, in response to Karen's citation.

The humanities, and, especially Shakespeare, help us to transcend
nationalism, and to see ourselves as human beings, as the term
"humanities" implies.

Shakespeare, of course, was rather nationalistic himself in his early
plays.  I would argue that he outgrew any such narrow outlook.

These considerations are especially relevant now when we can expect the
drum beaters to pressure us to join the parade in support of US
sponsored NATO folly.

      Roger Schmeeckle
 

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