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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: April ::
Re: Henry
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0692  Tuesday, 20 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 09:52:03 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0675 Re: Henry

[2]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 14:15:19 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Henry

[3]     From:   Peter T. Hadorn <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 14:10:43 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.0682 Re: Henry

[4]     From:   Ben Schneider <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 15:15:11 +0000
        Subj:   Henry and Tasso

[5]     From:   Moira Russell <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 23:53:40 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0682 Re: Henry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1999 09:52:03 +0000
Subject: 10.0675 Re: Henry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0675 Re: Henry

Brian Haylett queries the usefulness of the Salic law, pointing to how
Canterbury argues that all kinds of France hold their titles illegally.
I would argue that this merely fleshes out Canterbury's earlier claim
that "miracles are ceas'd" (1.1.68 in the Oxford text).  The world of
this play is not a world in which power is divinely ordained; all kings
hold their positions by a mixture of usurpation and public support.
Henry's soldiers are not chivalric knights, but "warriors for the
working day."  Machiavellian Realpolitik has rigorously replaced the
ideal.  If Henry finds forgiveness for his and his father's sins, he
finds it as grace is always found, against a background of ubiquitous,
original sin.

Cheers,
Se

 

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