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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: April ::
Assorted Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0740  Saturday, 24 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 05:48:28 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0721 Re: Keanu Does Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
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        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 18:49:59 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Pop Culture

[3]     From:   Ben Schneider <
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        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 15:21:07 +0000
        Subj:   Give and Hazard

[4]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 09:37:24 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0727 Re: RSC MND

[5]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 07:36:02 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0725 Re: Space Opera


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 05:48:28 +0100
Subject: 10.0721 Re: Keanu Does Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0721 Re: Keanu Does Shakespeare

>While writing this out, I commented to my husband, "Every
> bastard in Shakespeare is evil-wait, that's not how it sounds!"
>
> Moira

Faulconbridge?  But he's early, and the only (?) exception.  And
Richard's hump-as-an-excuse is pretty close to Edmund on bastardy, so
maybe it's that not all evil bastards are bastards, and not all bastards
are evil bastards.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
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Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 18:49:59 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare and Pop Culture

First of all, more information on "Romeo Must Die".

 'Romeo' Gets Kick-Start

HOLLYWOOD (Variety) - The latest update of a Shakespeare play will take
the Bard into the 'hood with a film blending the hip-hop and Kung Fu
genres in a story culled from "Romeo and Juliet." "Romeo Must Die" will
star Jet Li as a chop-socky Romeo who falls for a black Juliet, played
by hip-hop singer Aaliyah. The pair's romance is inevitably frowned upon
by the other members of their crime families.

Also, you can now get your very own Shakespeare credit card. I received
an invitation today to apply for a "Avid Reader" Platinum Visa card. You
have a choice of Shakespeare, Poe, Mystery, Romance or "Classics" cards.

Jerry Bangham

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    http://www.win.net/~kudzu/

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Schneider <
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Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 15:21:07 +0000
Subject:        Give and Hazard

Bassanio has hazarded the most precious thing he has, the life of his
friend Antonio.  Cicero says that on this earth friendship is the most
valuable treasure that the great gods have given us.  Bassanio pays
Antonio back by hazarding  his wife (she could have annulled the
marriage because it wasn't consummated).   The play is patently a
dramatization of Seneca's De Beneficiis.

For more on this look up friendship on my web site at www.stoics.com,
where you will also find an article on what it means to give and hazard.

Yours ever,
BEN SCHNEIDER

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 09:37:24 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 10.0727 Re: RSC MND
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0727 Re: RSC MND

I am new to this list but I wonder if this thread began with the
controversy begun by the parochial teacher who removed his class from a
performance of MND, at Stratford-upon-Avon, last week.

Myself, I was taught that MND was written by the Bard to urge Elizabeth
to recognize the marriage of Catherine Grey and Edward Seymour.  To this
extent, I believe the play is about the indiscretion of youth, the
indiscretion in this case elopement.

Karl Marx wrote some wonderfully cynical things about elopement.  He
wrote that in England elopement is more permissible than in France and
Germany because it is easier in england, than France or Germany, for a
father to disinherit his children, even applying to family title.

Yours in the work,
Dana

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 07:36:02 +0100
Subject: 10.0725 Re: Space Opera
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0725 Re: Space Opera

>No, but Return to the Forbidden Planet might be. It recounts the tale of
>Doctor Prospero, his daughter Miranda, and the space-bound hero Captain
>Tempest.
>
>Ray Lischner  (http://www.bardware.com)
>co-author (with John Doyle) of Shakespeare for Dummies

Is this the p-c version with Roberta the Robot?

Robin Hamilton.
 

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