1999

Who Chooseth Me

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0694  Tuesday, 20 April 1999.

From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1999 10:32:03 -0500
Subject:        Who Chooseth Me

Brian Haylett should observe that like all the suitors, Bassanio must
(if a loser in the lottery) abandon all hope of marriage to any other
woman.  But in a larger sense this inscription is about marriage itself,
a person entering into marriage must give and hazard all he/she has.  So
when he contemplates the leaden choice, B. is in effect choosing
marriage.  A nice touch in the play.  The best comment on risk in MV is
by David Bevington in his one-vol edn. of Shak.  1992.  (I have not
checked his most recent edn. or his edns. ?1973 and 1980)  The
interpretation is much broader than just this inscription, but it will
be of interest to Brian and probably others.

Cheers,
John Velz

Snakes in Denmark?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0693  Tuesday, 20 April 1999.

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1999 10:17:54 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Snakes in Denmark?

Dear List Members:

Thank you, first of all, for responses to my inquiries on a Beaumont and
Fletcher edition. I am thinking very seriously of pursuing further the
possibility of such a project. If anyone has had experience with both
Oxford and Penguin as publishers he/she has worked with, I'd be
interested in knowing his/her preference.

On rereading Hamlet, I am now wondering about snakes in Denmark. The
story has been told that King Hamlet died of a snakebite, but no, the
ghost tells us, Claudius killed him. The feasibility of the snakebite
story may depend on whether there were poisonous snakes in Denmark. Was
the snakebite story plausible at first, or was it suspicious at first?
Replies off-list are welcome.

Jack Heller
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: RSC MND

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0691  Tuesday, 20 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 18 Apr 1999 17:23:11 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Midsummer Night's Dream

[2]     From:   Lisa Hopkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 14:32:31 +0100
        Subj:   MND

[3]     From:   Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 20 Apr 1999 12:06:18 +1000
        Subj:   RSC MND


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Schmeeckle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 18 Apr 1999 17:23:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Midsummer Night's Dream

     What fools these mortals be.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1999 14:32:31 +0100
Subject:        MND

Thanks to Stuart Manger and Peter Holland for their comments on the
production.  I think we'll risk it.

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Apr 1999 12:06:18 +1000
Subject:        RSC MND

Although I will not have an opportunity to see the RSC production of
MND, I am slightly bemused at the comments about the sexual nature of
the production.  The play is about sexuality and about sexual
awakening.  The play script is not the text that was presented shrouded
in Mendelssohn and gauze at the turn of this century.  Read Montrose,
Laforgue, Wiles or any other recent writing on the play and performance
and it should make it clear that what is happening at Stratford should
happen.  It is a pity that such productions receive the criticism that
distracts from the substance of the performance.

I am privileged to have been involved in a production of MND that
de-gauzed the play script and helped a young audience find a relevance
in the words!

        Scott Crozier

Re: Henry

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0692  Tuesday, 20 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 09:52:03 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0675 Re: Henry

[2]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 14:15:19 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Henry

[3]     From:   Peter T. Hadorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 14:10:43 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.0682 Re: Henry

[4]     From:   Ben Schneider <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 15:15:11 +0000
        Subj:   Henry and Tasso

[5]     From:   Moira Russell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 19 Apr 1999 23:53:40 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0682 Re: Henry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Apr 1999 09:52:03 +0000
Subject: 10.0675 Re: Henry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0675 Re: Henry

Brian Haylett queries the usefulness of the Salic law, pointing to how
Canterbury argues that all kinds of France hold their titles illegally.
I would argue that this merely fleshes out Canterbury's earlier claim
that "miracles are ceas'd" (1.1.68 in the Oxford text).  The world of
this play is not a world in which power is divinely ordained; all kings
hold their positions by a mixture of usurpation and public support.
Henry's soldiers are not chivalric knights, but "warriors for the
working day."  Machiavellian Realpolitik has rigorously replaced the
ideal.  If Henry finds forgiveness for his and his father's sins, he
finds it as grace is always found, against a background of ubiquitous,
original sin.

Cheers,
Se


Tune for Romeo and Juliet?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0683  Monday, 19 April 1999.

From:           Stephanie Cowell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 18 Apr 1999 14:58:14 -0400
Subject:        Re: Tune for Romeo and Juliet?

Is there a known tune available for "An Old Hare Hoar," (is that right?)
from Romeo and Juliet?   Thanks very much!

Stephanie Cowell

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