1999

Re: Barton's War of the Roses

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0734  Saturday, 24 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 10:05:49 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses

[2]     From:   Tim Perfect <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 16:26:42
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses

[3]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sat, 24 Apr 1999 09:45:05 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 10:05:49 -0700
Subject: 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses

Jeff Kean wrote:

> I recall several years ago hearing of a production that John Barton put
> together combining several of the histories into one show entitled The
> War of the Roses. Does anyone know if this is available in print or
> script form?

I hope someone will give a fuller answer, but just in case not, the
script was published in England in the 70s, I think.  I don't have
publisher or author credits, but the author's are probably listed as
William Shakespeare and John Barton.  I hope someone will make my answer
look callow and give full details.

I have sought the published script in used bookstores in 4 countries.
Can't find it.

mj

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tim Perfect <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 16:26:42
Subject: 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses

>I recall several years ago hearing of a production that John Barton put
>together combining several of the histories into one show entitled The
>War of the Roses. Does anyone know if this is available in print or
>script form?

Actually, I recall that the Cincinnatti Shakespeare Festival did a show
by the same title, it was adapted by R. Chris Reeder from Shakespeare's
Henry VI trilogy, and Directed by Jasson Minadakis, perhaps Mr. Godshalk
has more specific info...

Tim Perfect
Cleveland Shakespeare Festival
http://www.cleveshakes.org

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sat, 24 Apr 1999 09:45:05 +1000
Subject: 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0728 Q: Barton's War of the Roses

I don't know if it is easily available for performance purposes, but
Jeff Kean could probably contact the RSC for a definitive answer (their
website is http://www.rsc.org.uk ).

If Mr. Kean or anyone else is curious about the War of the Roses
production, in Dollimore & Sinefield's Political Shakespeare (2nd ed.)
Sinefield has an interesting essay on the post-war fortunes of the RSC
which discusses the War of the Roses project in some detail.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

Re: BBC Don John

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0733  Saturday, 24 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 09:59:27 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 10.0721 Re: Keanu Does Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Patricia Cooke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 24 Apr 1999 08:00:34 +1200
        Subj:   Keanu and Don John


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 09:59:27 -0700
Subject: Re: Keanu Does Shakespeare
Comment:        SHK 10.0721 Re: Keanu Does Shakespeare

To Moira Russell:

The BBC Television Shakespeare, all 36 productions, are available in
America from The Writing Company.  They have a website, though I did not
bookmark the webaddress.  They are dear, just a few pennies under $100.

There isn't a lot available on the production.  The BBC did publish the
script with intro essays, and that is worth seeking out.  Back issues on
Shakespeare on Film Newsletter discuss it.  These are available through
Shakespeare Bulletin/Lafayette College/Easton, PA USA 18042.

If memory serves, Susan Willis' wonderful book on the series does not
dwell on it much.  I don't remember if Coursen or Cowell do in any of
their books.  It is worth checking.

BTW, not all Shakespeare's bastards are villains.  Don't forget the
Bastard in King John.

Best,
mj

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Cooke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 24 Apr 1999 08:00:34 +1200
Subject:        Keanu and Don John

For Moira Russell - The actor who played Don John is called Vernon
Dobtcheff and the production is the BBC Shakespeare series produced by
Shaun Sutton.  Since telling Mike Jensen this, I have watched it again
and think Dobtcheff was excellent in the role, something I had not
noticed at first.  Silent, sour-looking and dressed in black, he had
spoil-sport written all over him.  BBC Shakespeare videos are available
still, as far as I know, from the BBC in London (Bush House).  Can't
really remember Keanu Reeves much in the film, too busy enjoying most of
the rest of it.

Patricia Cooke, Secretary & Editor
Shakespeare Globe Centre New Zealand Inc
97 Elizabeth Street Wellington 6001 New Zealand PH/FAX 64 4 3856743

Re: Elizabethan Feminisms

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0731  Saturday, 24 April 1999.

[1]     From:   Douglas Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 12:40:16 -0400
        Subj:   Elizabethan Feminisms

[2]     From:   Tiffany Rasovic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 13:18:01 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

[3]     From:   Alicia Shank <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 14:05:14 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

[4]     From:   Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 14:16:14 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

[5]     From:   Janet Maclellan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 15:58:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

[6]     From:   Deborah L. Reed <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 13:27:11 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 12:40:16 -0400
Subject:        Elizabethan Feminisms

In reply to Bill Allard:  I would encourage you to bring these issues up
in the class rather than moving the discussion to another forum.  I also
hold to the view that "academia is a marketplace of ideas where opposing
views may be expressed" (though I have my doubts about the metaphor of
the "marketplace") but you must express those views in the classroom,
even if they are unpopular, for them to be discussed in your class.  My
best class discussions often spring from exactly this kind of encounter
of opposing views, and you may be impoverishing your class by not
bringing them up.

Cheers,
Doug Lanier
University of New Hampshire

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tiffany Rasovic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 13:18:01 -0400
Subject: 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

Hi Bill,

I think your questioning of certain aspects of feminist criticism is
really valuable.  I don't mean to be judgmental, (and I do consider
myself a feminist, although I style it New Humanism), but it seems that
some of your classmates are recycling easy theoretical configurations in
their interpretation of the text.  What I have always found so great
about the 4 lovers  in MND is that the two men are just as insipid and
interchangeable as the women!  One forgets that masculinity can be
"read" just as constructions of femininity can be read.  I think
Shakespeare is showing how competition in love and marriage-especially
in young people-can turn anyone into a fool-certainly, Puck's antics,
and possibly Theseus' and Egeus' rigid, anti-imaginative perspectives,
poke fun at conventions of male power and reason by eliminating the
guise of control or objectivity.

I find many Shakespearean men to be very fascinating and
sympathetic-even ones who say things that might make me bristle at first
read.  The thing that "saves" them in my eyes is the way that
Shakespeare seems to be very conscious of the conventions,
misunderstandings, restrictions, and even the hatreds which exist
between men and women, rulers and ruled,  between siblings, and so
forth.  Shakespeare is no simple misogynist, nor is he totally
supportive of men and various forms of hegemony or control by
hierarchy.  You should certainly trust yourself-read the women in
different ways, don't assume that there is never such a thing as
subjectivity or agency in the woman-they have it, it is simply
thwarted.  Furthermore, don't assume that the men are always the
subjects, agents, or "authors", they too are subject to "forces" beyond
their control-again, a big theme in MND!   Until we read masculinity
with the same scrutiny that we have read femininity, we certainly will
not "solve the problem"!

I am totally behind you, Bill.  Put your readings on the "market."

Yours,
TR

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alicia Shank <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 14:05:14 +0000
Subject: 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

One of my favorite scenes in Much Ado about Nothing is 4.1, where
Benedick declares his love for Beatrice and she responds.  Afterwards,
Benedick bids Beatrice to ask him for anything, but Beatrice's request
surprises him:

BENEDICK: Come, bid me do anything for thee.
BEATRICE: Kill Claudio.
BENEDICK: Ha!  Not for the wide world.  (287-289)

Benedick obviously thinks it would be a bad idea, but after a longer
discussion, for no other motive that I could see than its importance to
Beatrice, Benedick relents.

BENEDICK: Think you in your soul the Count Claudio hath wronged Hero?
BEATRICE: Yea, as sure as I have a thought or a soul.
BENEDICK: Enough, I am engaged.  I will challenge him.  (328-330).

This is only one specific example of a male Shakespearean character's
noble relations toward a female.  In my opinion, the form of "love"
portrayed in A Midsummer Night's Dream is immature compared to some of
Shakespeare's other plays, so none of the characters (male or female)
are behaving as honorably as they could.

Alicia Shank
Bethel College

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 14:16:14 EDT
Subject: 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

Here's your can of worms:

We rather like Petruchio in our currently rehearsing production.  He
goes out of his way to open Kate's eyes to her selfish behavior, and
puts himself in harm's/ridicule's way to do so.  I know that the text,
if taken at face value, makes him just as big a pig as Kate, but since
he quite plainly says he's being "politic," then I think we are
justified in taking his "goods and chattels" comments with a grain of
salt.

Both Pete and Kate, in our production, fling societal standards in
everyone's faces.  Their supposed espousal of these standards parallels
Petruchio's action "under the name of perfect love" and are just as
mocking.  Kate's final speech becomes a triumph of ambiguity: the women
she lectures have made their bed and must lie in it
(gender-role-speaking-wise, as Prof. Schickele would say), while at the
same time she recognizes the truth in her comments on what the sexes (at
that time and place) owe each other.

We haven't worked out all the kinks yet, and this structure may collapse
upon our heads in ruin in the coming weeks, but so far we think
Petruchio is pretty worthy of his mate.

Dale

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Maclellan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 15:58:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Q: Elizabethan Feminism
Comment:        SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

Bill Allard writes: "Is there any male Shakesperian character who has
any redeeming qualities in his relationship with women?"

I'd suggest Posthumus in 5.1 of Cymbeline. Prior to this scene he hasn't
done very well: he's fallen for Iachimo's slander of his wife Imogen,
spouted all sorts of misogynist cliches, and ordered his servant to kill
her for her supposed infidelity. In 5.1, however, he admits that he was
wrong to do so-and he makes this admission before he discovers that she
was in fact faithful to him:

You married ones,
If each of you should take this course, how many
Must murder wives much better than themselves
For wrying but a little!  (2-5)

It is a remarkable statement for a Shakesperian male.

Janet MacLellan
University of Toronto
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Deborah L. Reed <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 13:27:11 -0700
Subject: 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0729 Q: Elizabethan Feminism

>My question is
>this: Is there any male Shakesperian character who has any redeeming
>qualities in his relationship with women? I realize this may open a can
>of worms, but I do cling to what seems like a quickly fading notion that
>academia is a marketplace of ideas where opposing views may be
>expressed.
>
>If men and women are the cause of the battle of the sexes, I do not see
>how this angle of feminist criticism does anything to solve the problem.

"Can of worms" indeed.  Since when is the goal of feminist criticism to
bring an end to the battle of the sexes?  I'm all in favor of analysis
that discomfits.  The playwright, not the feminists, raises the issue of
the commodification of women under a patriarchal system in MND (the
conquered Hippolyta, the bartered daughter), yet the resolution does not
seem particularly revolutionary or liberating.  Marital accord/the end
to the battle of the sexes in this comedy is achieved when the
characters acquiesce to the ultimate patriarch, yes?

As to the question of redeeming qualities, I see them in Othello's
relationship with Desdemona.

Deborah Reed

Re: Shakespeare Programs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0732  Saturday, 24 April 1999.

[1]     From:   John Jowett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 Apr 1999 17:04:48 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0718 Q: Shakespeare Programs

[2]     From:   John Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sat, 24 Apr 1999 09:54:42 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   SHK 10.0722 Re: Shakespeare Programs


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Jowett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 17:04:48 GMT
Subject: 10.0718 Q: Shakespeare Programs
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0718 Q: Shakespeare Programs

Eric Luhrs enquires about graduate programmes in Shakespeare.  The
Shakespeare Institute accepts suitably qualified students for a one-year
MA in Shakespeare Studies, and for research degrees up to and including
PhD on Shakespeare and related topics.  The Institute has its own
dedicated Shakespeare library.  The RSC's Stratford theatres and the
resources of the Shakespeare Centre are on its doorstep, and the
libraries of Oxford lie within 40 miles.  For details contact Etta Mahon
at the address below.

John Jowett,
The Shakespeare Institute,
Church Street, Stratford upon Avon,
Warks. CV37 6HP, UK.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sat, 24 Apr 1999 09:54:42 +0100 (BST)
Subject: Re: Shakespeare Programs
Comment:        SHK 10.0722 Re: Shakespeare Programs

John Further to A.D. Murphy's reply to Eric Luhrs, graduate programmes
in Shakespeare studies are also offered at the University of Bristol
(http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/English/ma_shk.html) - though the MA
programme in interested in Shakespeare's works as part of its concern to
explore the nature of literary relations, influence and creativity.

Biographical Index to Elizabethan Theater

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0730  Friday, 23 April 1999.

From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 Apr 1999 09:58:51 -0500
Subject:        Biographical Index to Elizabethan Theater

To all:

In honor of Shakespeare's (maybe) birthday, I'd like to formally
announce a project that I've mentioned in passing here before.  It's a
Biographical Index to Elizabethan Theater, and it's a framework for an
eventual Biographical Dictionary of Elizabethan Theater.  As it stands
now, the Index is an alphabetical list of every person known to have
been involved in theater in England between 1558 and 1642 (plus English
actors on the continent).  It includes actors, playwrights (including
writers of masques, entertainments, and academic plays), patrons,
Masters of the Revels and Lords Chamberlain, theater musicians,
songwriters who wrote for the theater, theatrical managers and
entreprenerus (such as Philip Henslowe and Francis Langley), carpenters
who built theaters, minor theater functionaries (such as gatherers), and
miscellaneous other people who don't fit any of these categories but who
are important for theater history (such as Francis Meres and William
Prynne).

Each entry contains the person's dates of birth and death (where known),
their role(s) in the theater, any family relationships with other people
on the list, and a chronological list of secondary sources containing
biographical information about the subject, primarily those published
since Chambers' Elizabethan Stage (1923).  These lists contain
abbreviated citations which a user can click on to go to the full
citation in the bibliography.  Only biographical sources are indexed;
works of criticism are not included unless they contain significant
biographical material.

This is a work in progress, and while I have no illusions that it is
fully complete, it is still the most complete index of this type that
has been compiled.  One of the reasons I want to make it available to
the scholarly community is to allow people to send in corrections and
omissions, so that ultimately it will reflect the collective knowledge
of all of us.  Something like this has been badly needed for a long
time;
Chambers, Bentley, and Nungezer are still used as sources of
biographical information about Elizabethan theater people, but despite
their usefulness, they're many decades out of date.  I've discovered
that even the best scholars have sometimes been unaware of biographical
discoveries made since those standard references were published.
There's just so much that's been discovered, most of it published in
scattered books and journals, that it's impossible for one person to
keep track of it all.  This index should help remedy that, and the fact
that it's on the web means that it can always be kept up to date.

The URL for the index is:

http://www.clark.net/pub/tross/ws/bd/kathman.htm

I welcome any and all suggestions, corrections, additions, or other
comments.

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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