1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0803  Monday, 3 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Ben Schneider <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 30 Apr 1999 15:40:07 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0790 Re: Chooseth

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sun, 2 May 1999 20:02:20 -0400
        Subj:   Parsley Stuffing

[3]     From:   Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sun, 2 May 1999 20:05:35 -0400
        Subj:   Stage Blood


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Schneider <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 30 Apr 1999 15:40:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 10.0790 Re: Chooseth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0790 Re: Chooseth

Check out the real source of gift-giving in Shakespeare, translated in
1578, Senecas De Beneficiis, now available at www.stoics.com, my web
site.  A real gift has no strings.

Yours ever
BEN SCHNEIDER

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sun, 2 May 1999 20:02:20 -0400
Subject:        Parsley Stuffing

I think the alleged funny part in the TS joke about a wench getting
married on the way to get parsley to stuff a rabbit was the parsley, not
the stuffing. Parsley was reputed to be a dynamic aphrodisiac. The
modern equivalent, told by Beavis & Butthead, would be something like,
"This girl "got married" (heh, heh) on the way to a party when she took
some Ecstasy."

Alan Bray, in "Homosexuality in Renaissance England," refers to "getting
married" as a term used for making love in "molly houses" (more or less
what we would call "gay bars," given the impossibility of finding
parallels in utterly different societies).

Parsley definitely is a diuretic, so the ever-reliable body-functions
humor comes in here too. Don't forget that women wore shifts but not
underpants, so the association of ideas would have been something like
eating parsley-having to urinate-squatting in the field-one thing leads
to another.

By the way, "get stuffed" in the modern context is used to/about men,
based on the supposedly shocking idea that the recipient is liable to be
penetrated by another man. The imputation is much less insulting when
used of a man.

Dana Shilling
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sun, 2 May 1999 20:05:35 -0400
Subject:        Stage Blood

I suspect that Shakespeare and his contemporary theaters used the same
thing for stage blood as they used for Cleopatra's barge, the morn in
russet mantle clad, temple-haunting martlets-i.e., they described
something that they didn't have in material form. Considering that
elaborate costumes were a (if not THE) major capital expenditure for a
theater company, they couldn't risk getting gooey red substances all
over them-particularly in light of the primitive laundry practices
discussed in another thread.

Dana Shilling
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.