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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Assorted Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0821  Wednesday, 5 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 04 May 1999 11:34:07 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Hal, R2 & R3

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 4 May 1999 13:15:37 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0793 Re: Evil that Men Do

[3]     From:   Anthony Burton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 4 May 1999 10:22:37 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0658  Re: Biondello

[4]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 04 May 1999 13:45:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0811 Re: Q/W/E/R/T/Y (October 1999)

[5]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 04 May 1999 13:50:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0812 Mixed Responses

[6]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 04 May 1999 13:58:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0817 Shakespeare and Islam

[7]     From:   Yashdip Bains <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 04 May 1999 15:02:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   SHK 10.0809 Shakespeare Translations

[8]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 04 May 1999 21:06:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0816 Re: CSF Richard III


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Tuesday, 04 May 1999 11:34:07 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Hal, R2 & R3

In answer to Mary Jane Chaffee's question, I think the most insightful
commentary on Bolingbroke is still, after all these years, John Palmer,
Political and Comic Characters in Shakespere London, 1945; rpt.  London,
New York: MacMillian, St. Martin's Press, 1962. On Richard II, I highly
recommend Lois Potter, "The Antic Disposition of Richard II,"
Shakespeare Survey 27 (1974): 33-41.

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Tuesday, 4 May 1999 13:15:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.0793 Re: Evil that Men Do
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0793 Re: Evil that Men Do

>there's a further question:
>should we wait for pure motivations before acting?  Isn't that
>tantamount to absolute quietism?

Waiting for pure motives may be quietism, but seeking out purer motives
seems to me closer to existentialist good faith.

><snip> We might similarly
>fumble a bit in worrying about first defining justice, before acting
>conscientiously, instead of the other way around.  As with Hamlet, we
>find ourselves in a situation where doing nothing is inherently wrong,
>and introspectively defining our terms is merely self-indulgent.  Then
>again, like Hamlet, we may not be offered any right move.

His hesitation at the door of the chapel is based on Christian
principles.  So how come he never considers the unambiguous Christian
position: turn the other cheek?  Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord and
all that.  As some kind of Christianized pagan, a right move is offered
him, but seems to be beneath his contempt.  He needs a dramatic
rendition of the Trojan War to remind him that doing nothing is
"inherently wrong."

Clifford Stetner
CUNY

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Burton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 4 May 1999 10:22:37 -0700
Subject: 10.0658  Re: Biondello
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0658  Re: Biondello

Forgive my tardy continuation of the discussion of "to stuff" in its
sexual meaning.  One of the spicy tidbits that rewarded students dogged
enough to undertake a fourth year of French at my high school, was to
learn that etoffer (I don't know how to do an accent on the first 'e')
-- "to stuff" was (as we all then knew in English) slang for "to have
sexual intercourse"  -- I observe the amenities of my 1950's instructor
in providing the English equivalent.  Anyhow, the 1966 University Books
reprint of John S. Farmer's 1896 "Vocabula Amatoria"  cites Rabelais for
"etoffe" = "the female pubend," reflecting approximately the same sense
for "stuff" five hundred years ago.  I won't go beyond my own
bookshelves to look further, but for those more intensely committed  to
finding an origin of the English usage,  the likelihod of an early
borrowing from the French seems high, and early English-French
dictionaries, like Cotgrave's (1611), might do the job.  If so, I'd be
glad to receive a report.

Tony Burton

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Tuesday, 04 May 1999 13:45:17 -0400
Subject: 10.0811 Re: Q/W/E/R/T/Y (October 1999)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0811 Re: Q/W/E/R/T/Y (October 1999)

Bertrand Rouge' wrote:

>No, I haven't discovered any lost manuscript. I only wish I had... So,
>_Richard III_ is the play, as appeared in the end of my previous
>message.

And I thought for sure you were referring to the last scene of KJ.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Tuesday, 04 May 1999 13:50:52 -0400
Subject: 10.0812 Mixed Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0812 Mixed Responses

Frank Wigham wrote:

>Aside from the irresistible temptation to seize the chance to write this
>subject line, it also seems mildly worth observing that for all of
>Shakespeare's nominally infinite riches, some folks still feel fine
>about presenting their own views of him as the "real" answer (though of
>course Dana Shilling very properly says "I think").

I am informed by a medical professional that parsley does have mild
diuretic effects.  Whether this is  is aphrodisiacal depends on your
point of view.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Tuesday, 04 May 1999 13:58:11 -0400
Subject: 10.0817 Shakespeare and Islam
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0817 Shakespeare and Islam

Hardy wrote:

>[Editor's Note: Dale Lyles, who addresses unsolicited messages from
>students and other non-members of SHAKSPER, and I could not decided to
>do with the message below. I've edited it to try to make as much sense
>of the question as I can and invite anyone who wishes to respond to do
>so directly to Alia Bin Darwish <
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 >. -Hardy]

>I wonder if you can give me a hand in the essay  I'm doing. You see my
>doctor said that Shakespeare's plays are much related to certain Islamic
>concepts - something like Sufism and the idea of life after death I
>wonder if it's true or maybe my doctor was feeling sleepy.

I suspect the key word in the professor's comment is "concepts."   I am
sure that the Koran and Shakespeare address many of the same
conceptions.  This is because many of the notions in both canons are
nearly universal, not because one book was influenced by the other.  The
idea of an afterlife, for example, is not unique to Islam or
Shakespeare.

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Yashdip Bains <
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Date:           Tuesday, 04 May 1999 15:02:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Shakespeare Translations
Comment:        SHK 10.0809 Shakespeare Translations

Last year Punjabi University, Patiala, published a translation of
Hamlet, Macbeth, Lear and Othello into Punjabi, the language spoken in
the Punjab. The translator is a prominent poet, playwright and historian
named Surjit Singh Hans. When he retired as Professor of History from
Guru Nanak Dev University in 1993, he was hired by Punjabi University
specifically for this project. There is no complete translation of
Shakespeare in Punjabi. Hans's book is available from the Publication
Bureau, Punjabi University, Patiala 147002, India. Yashdip Bains,
University of Cincinnati (
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[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 04 May 1999 21:06:52 -0400
Subject: 10.0816 Re: CSF Richard III
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0816 Re: CSF Richard III

I want to thank John Drakakis and Terry Hawkes for their kind words
regarding my review of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival's Richard
III.  Contrary to their assumptions, the only part I have played in this
production is auditor.  If cultural materialists decry character
criticism, character assassination seems to be their line of work.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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