Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Re: Henry
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0824  Thursday, 6 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Ben Schneider <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 May 1999 11:05:32 +0000
        Subj:   Henry

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 05 May 1999 21:58:08 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0819 Re: Henry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Schneider <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 May 1999 11:05:32 +0000
Subject:        Henry

Dear Professor Hawkes,

If you have any external evidence that Henry's behavior toward Catherine
is "porcine" I would very much like to know what it is, because I have
very copious and very good external evidence in my Stoic books (see
www.stoics.com) to the effect that he is the very model of a perfect
Plain Dealer or honest man.   If you are just giving us your emotional
responses to authority figures of any sort, then we can respect it as we
respect any man's opinion.

Yours truly,
BEN SCHNEIDER

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 05 May 1999 21:58:08 -0400
Subject: 10.0819 Re: Henry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0819 Re: Henry

Hugh Grady writes:

>In regards to Judith Craig's objection to my supposed substitution of
>Machiavellianism for idealism (actually I think it is Shakespeare's), I
>want to report my relief in reading her characterization of Falstaff and
>the taverners, as "disease-ridden cells of vice that should be expunged
>to save the whole." With such idealism, who needs Machiavelli?

If a society is really to be judged by the way it treats its criminals,
a society that expunges Falstaff and company as "disease-ridden cells of
vice" while countenancing the biggest thief of all on the throne is
going to have a difficult time getting a passing grade.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.