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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Assorted Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0825  Thursday, 6 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Andrew White <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 4 May 1999 20:16:07 -0400
        Subj:   Richard III

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 5 May 1999 13:05:37 -0400
        Subj:   CSF Richard 111

[3]     From:   Charlie Mitchell <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 05 May 1999 16:27:50 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0796 Re: Caliban


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew White <
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Date:           Tuesday, 4 May 1999 20:16:07 -0400
Subject:        Richard III

Actually, as Richard III lore goes, this is an interesting touch.

A recent production (a couple years back) at the Shakespeare Rep in
Chicago featured fights choreographed by Robin McFarquhar; he said the
final battle was climaxed by hand-to-hand combat, with Richmond breaking
Richard's neck.

This motion, turning the head sharply to one side, was accompanied by
the ghosts of all of Richard's victims, who stood face-forward to the
audience, and mimed the same motion of Richmond's hands.  Sounded quite
poetic to me.

Andrew White
Arlington, VA

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 5 May 1999 13:05:37 -0400
Subject:        CSF Richard 111

Dear Bill Godshalk, Now please don't upset yourself about character.
Your secrets are safe with me. It's still my intention to nominate you
for the award of The Golden Quill. I'm sure you'll know what to do with
it.

T. Hawkes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charlie Mitchell <
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Date:           Wednesday, 05 May 1999 16:27:50 -0600
Subject: 10.0796 Re: Caliban
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0796 Re: Caliban

How can Caliban or even Sycorax rule the island when there is nobody
else on it?  Don't you need a community to be king?  Shakespeare takes
pains to remind us that that the spirits aren't people even though Ariel
has a personality ("Mine would, sir, were I human").  Caliban supports
this by saying that that he is Prospero's only subject on the island.

This has always been my problem with colonialist readings of the play.
No one is native to this space between Milan and Carthage except for the
spirits and they are forces that Prospero has learn to shape.  There is
also no eradication of native language, religious practice or government
which I would think would be necessary to support a colonialist view of
the play.  Caliban had no language and characterizes himself as an
animal when Prospero first came to the island ("Thou strok'st me").
Sycorax apparently died in childbirth because there is no mention (I
think) of Prospero killing or subduing her and Trinculo and Stephano
never support Caliban's characterization of them as gods.
 

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