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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Re: Troilus and Cressida
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0836  Monday, 10 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Bruce Golden <
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        Date:   Friday, 7 May 1999 08:37:15 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0832 Re: Assorted Responses

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Sunday, 9 May 1999 13:31:42 -0400
        Subj:   More Genre


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bruce Golden <
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Date:           Friday, 7 May 1999 08:37:15 +0000
Subject: 10.0832 Re: Assorted Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0832 Re: Assorted Responses

Re: T&C genre (again, or still).

For those interested in an even earlier, more (old) historical based
claim that this play is satire ( a study listed even in the up-to-date
Norton edition in the selected bibliography for the play), is Oscar J.
Campbell, Comical Satyre and Shakespeare's T&C, San Marino CA:
Huntington Library, 1938.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Sunday, 9 May 1999 13:31:42 -0400
Subject:        More Genre

Troilus & Cressida was classed as a comedy because there were only three
options considered (Tragedy/Comedy/History). History might have been a
better choice, but after all T&C is about private rather than the public
matters of the English Histories.

"Problem Play," "Beats Me," and <INVALID PASSWORD> were not available as
categories, so the inquiry defaulted to a simple vertical:horizontal
ratio.

No matter how miserable, sexually harassed, or venereally diseased most
of the characters of T&C are, most of them are nevertheless alive at the
final curtain.

Dana Shilling

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PS-not only is it a great theatrical effect for Lavinia to hold the bowl
between her stumps, she would no doubt be downstage of Chiron &
Demetrius, making it easier for the audience to "see" nonexistent
gushing blood. Like the shower scene in Psycho-there are shots of Janet
Leigh's body and the knife, but not together.
 

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