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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
A Couple Questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0846  Wednesday, 12 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Benjamin Michael Smith <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 May 1999 09:05:52 +0000
        Subj:   Macbeth on Film

[2]     From:   Kimberly Van Brunt <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 May 99 23:46:21 PDT
        Subj:   Ophelia


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Benjamin Michael Smith <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 May 1999 09:05:52 +0000
Subject:        Macbeth on Film

Hello!

I have a question regarding Orson Welles' film production of "Macbeth",
filmed in 1948 on a tiny budget.  He made the film in only 23 days,
which seems impossible by current movie-making standards.  The question
is addressed to those fellow Shakespeareans who are familiar with the
film and may have an opinion on it.

Here is the question: Why do you think Welles' creates the character of
the Holy Father, adds the Christian ritual at the execution of the
former Thane of Cawdor, and peppers the film with Christian imagery?  Is
he trying to make a statement about the supernatural aspect of the
battle of good vs. evil in earthly kingdoms or do you think he was
adding a historical element to the film which is not intended to lead
the viewer to deeper thoughts on the supernatural?

         Ben

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kimberly Van Brunt <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 May 99 23:46:21 PDT
Subject:        Ophelia

I am interested in a character study of Ophelia, and have recently
focused on the idea of betrayal.  Ophelia certainly betrays Hamlet, but
not out of self-love and self-interest, rather it is for her father's
interest.  I also realize that Hamlet "betrays" her in the mousetrap
scene as well by slandering her, but I find this too easily justifiable
in light of Ophelia's recent actions toward him (personally motivated or
not).  Is Ophelia completely innocent and without fault in this play, or
does her fierce loyalty to her family and traditions cause her to lose
sight of what's important?
 

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