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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Various Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0857  Thursday, 13 May 1999.

[1]     From:   David Kathman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 May 1999 09:25:30 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0837 Various Responses

[2]     From:   Ron Dwelle <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 May 1999 10:43:57 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0848 Re: Time of *Ham.*

[3]     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 May 1999 11:31:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0846 Macbeth on Film

[4]     From:   Louis Marder <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 May 1999 11:40:19 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Lack of Toilets

[5]     From:   Anthony Burton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 May 1999 12:38:22 -0700
        Subj:   Corambis


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 May 1999 09:25:30 -0500
Subject: 10.0837 Various Responses
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0837 Various Responses

Jack Heller wrote:

>I have decided to pursue the task of putting together a marketable
>edition of Beaumont and Fletcher plays. "The Maid's Tragedy"
>(co-written) is currently available with "The Tragedy of Valentinian"
>(Fletcher only) in the Oxford edition of "Four Jacobean Sex Tragedies."
>Therefore, the plays I am thinking of including are "The Knight of the
>Burning Pestle," "The Faithful Shepherdess," "Philaster," and "A King
>and No King." Am I overlooking any more-necessary play by Beaumont and
>Fletcher? Do these choices seem appropriate and sufficient? Your
>comments offlist will be appreciated.

The 1979 Revels edition of "The Maid's Tragedy" was also just reprinted,
and the New Mermaids "The Knight of the Burning Pestle" is still in
print.  I don't see why you couldn't include "The Maid's Tragedy" in
your edition, since it was one of B&F's most popular plays.  The others
you've named seem like good choices, although "Knight of the Burning
Pestle" is generally thought to be by Beaumont alone, and "The Faithful
Shepherdess" by Fletcher alone.

Dave Kathman

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 May 1999 10:43:57 -0400
Subject: 10.0848 Re: Time of *Ham.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0848 Re: Time of *Ham.*

I think these attempts at accurate or precise dating are rather off the
point. The major contrast of the play is between the "old" ways
(involving primitive revenge in particular) and the "new" ways (the
enlightenment of Wittenberg). There are ample references and allusions
to both (it's everywhere and in almost all characters), so that the
audience can't very well miss the point.

Shakespeare seems to be an excellent playwright but a rather mediocre
historian (if you can equate lack of interest with mediocrity).

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 May 1999 11:31:21 -0400
Subject: 10.0846 Macbeth on Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0846 Macbeth on Film

Ben Michael wrote:

>... Why do you think Welles' creates the character of
>the Holy Father, adds the Christian ritual at the execution of the
>former Thane of Cawdor, and peppers the film with Christian imagery?

Arrogance.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 May 1999 11:40:19 -0500
Subject:        Re: Lack of Toilets

I will not take the time now (unless you say please) to check the page,
but in Taine's History of English Literature there is a reference to an
aspect of this subject.  Taine is describing a performance. He talks of
the stench of the Piss pot in the pit during a performance.  The stench
often became oppressive and members of the audience  would start to yell
repeatedly, "Burn the Juniper, burn the juniper!"  A dish of smoldering
Juniper chip would be thrust out on the stage and fill the air with its
scented fragrance.  Louis Marder, Shakespeare Data Bank.   P.S. Whether
there was a screen around the pot, or what the ladies did, I cannot
tell.  I would suppose that ladies would anticipate  their needs before
going into the theater.  
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[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Burton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 May 1999 12:38:22 -0700
Subject:        Corambis

Andy Drewry can find a good study by Doris V. Falk of the name Corambis
(as a play  on the Latin words for recooked cabbage, and signifying a
retailer of stale proverbs, etc.)  in Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. XVIII,
No. 1 (Winter, 1967),  "Proverbs and the Polonius Destiny."  Phillip
Edwards' introduction to the Cambridge Hamlet adopts the explanation as
excellent and attributes it to Gollancz, which takes us back nearly half
a century, if not more;  I don't know where Gollancz made his
suggestion, and I think Falk made her case without citing him.

I haven't seen a discussion of the name "Polonius" that's worth passing
along, or that "explains" anything.
 

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