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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Various Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0865  Monday, 17 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 May 1999 11:03:31 -0400
        Subj:   Thus Makes She Her Great Ps

[2]     From:   Andy White <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 May 1999 20:59:40 -0400
        Subj:   "User's Guide" -- What Use?

[3]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Sunday, 16 May 1999 14:49:27 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 10.0851 MND Plagiarism

[4]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Sunday, 16 May 1999 19:16:14 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0854 Re: Juliet's Age


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Friday, 14 May 1999 11:03:31 -0400
Subject:        Thus Makes She Her Great Ps

Robertson Davies says that Victorian theaters didn't find it necessary
to provide "retiring-rooms" for their six-hour performances. NYC
theaters and concert halls, even today, are notorious for not having
enough ladies' room facilities to cope with the traffic.

Maybe if Launce (TGV) brought his dog to the theater, a gentlewoman in a
farthingale would make water on Crab. Turnabout is fair play.

Dana Shilling

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andy White <
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Date:           Friday, 14 May 1999 20:59:40 -0400
Subject:        "User's Guide" -- What Use?

A recent reference to Mr. Pennington's book has me wondering:  I don't
think we've had a good discussion of that book, even though it's been
out for some time.  The following are my admittedly biased observations
on the book, designed to generate some discussion.

 -- Warning:  those who like Pennington and think he's right on can skip
to the next digest:

It seems to me that Pennington has enjoyed his latter-day role as
Claudius far too much, and gives us as negative an interpretation of
Hamlet's motives as I have ever seen.  If Claudius were asked to prepare
an anti-Hamlet statement through his PR office, "User's Guide" would be
the result.

By trashing Hamlet's reputation, Pennington has misunderstood one of the
more basic distinctions in the drama-that between the anti-hero and the
non-hero.  His portrait of Hamlet is so consistently negative one has to
wonder who on earth would want to play the role, let alone see it
played.

For all the amusing side-discussions (his pizza-eating child-critic is a
personal favorite), I find "User's Guide" to be a heavily biased book.
This from an actor who, having played the role successfully, could have
done the job with a mite more objectivity.

First Freud, then Pennington, then ... well, how could things get worse?

Andy White
Arlington, VA

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Sunday, 16 May 1999 14:49:27 -0400
Subject: MND Plagiarism
Comment:        SHK 10.0851 MND Plagiarism

Dear Bill Godshalk,

The sentence 'She is being frustrated by her immortal ungrossness'
suggests to me that this student has been reading Harold Bloom.
Counselling may be available in the Cincinnatti area. However, there is
considerable unease on this side of the Atlantic that you have permitted
such an outbreak in the first place. Your Golden Quill is in the
balance, I'm afraid.

T. Hawkes

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Sunday, 16 May 1999 19:16:14 +0000
Subject: 10.0854 Re: Juliet's Age
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0854 Re: Juliet's Age

Dana Shilling writes:

>A very common pre-modern marriage pattern was multiple marriages, each
>lasting about 7 years (also the pre-divorce duration of the average
>contemporary marriage!). Typically, a girl's first marriage would be to
>a much older man, with her subsequent spouses getting progressively
>YOUNGER-i.e., a widow with a good inheritance might marry a tradesman,
>then after his death, marry the likeliest of the apprentices. Or, a man
>would remarry after death of one or more wives in childbirth or of
>disease.

Can you document this as a "very common pre-modern marriage patern"?  It
strikes me as being a summation of the career of the Wyf of Bathe...

Cheers,
Se

 

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