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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Assorted Responses
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0872  Tuesday, 18 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Frank Whigham <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 May 1999 11:27:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0862 Re: Chooseth

[2]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 May 1999 17:52:57 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0866 Various Questions

[3]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 May 1999 12:03:06 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: Lear and Suffering

[4]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 May 1999 20:43:02 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0865 MND Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <
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Date:           Monday, 17 May 1999 11:27:22 -0500
Subject: 10.0862 Re: Chooseth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0862 Re: Chooseth

While I don't easily see Bassanio as gay, many readers have long taken
the homoerotic account of Antonio, and his triangular relation with
Antonio and Portia, completely seriously. For strong (and early:
pre-gay-studies) arguments to this effect, see the following:

Midgely, Graham. "The Merchant of Venice: A Reconsideration." EIC 10
(1960): 119-33.

Hyman, Lawrence. "The Rival Lovers in The Merchant of Venice."
Shakespeare Quarterly 21 (1970): 109-16.

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Monday, 17 May 1999 17:52:57 +0100
Subject: 10.0866 Various Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0866 Various Questions

>I don't know if this is the proper place, but I am looking for a copy of
>the original 1919 C. T. Onions' A Shakespeare Glossary for a
>Shakespearian on our staff.

This is probably picky (well, it is!) but the bibliographical
information on my own copy (bought in 1967, date of printing 1963) gives
1911 as the first edition, 1919 as the second edition, and reprints with
additions and/or corrections up till 1958.  Was it after that that
deletions were made in later reprints?

Robin Hamilton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Monday, 17 May 1999 12:03:06 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: Lear and Suffering

I am interested in the historical material on which Shakespeare might
have modeled Lear.  I think there is a mention in the Chronicles of
Geoffry of Monmouth of a king Lucius who allowed the empire to
dissolve.  This may refer to emperor Lucius, the last king of Roman
Briton who raised an army in 410 AD departed to claim the throne of Rome
and never returned.

On this level, the Lear story may perhaps be connected with the legend
of Amfortatis, the original sinner king.  One of the sins of the sinner
king may have been letting the continuity of history with Rome be
broken.  The story of Lear is the story of a sinner king on many
levels.  In the story of Amfortatis, he falls asleep and castrates
himself with his own fallen sword.  In my opinion, this could be
connected with the four daughters of Lear: having no son to unify the
kingdom it was divided up among daughter.  The four daughters of Lear
may also be connected with the four daughters of Raymond Berengar, who
has his own connection with the legend of the sinner king.

Yours in the work,
Dana

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 17 May 1999 20:43:02 -0400
Subject: 10.0865 MND Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0865 MND Plagiarism

>The sentence 'She is being frustrated by her immortal ungrossness'
>suggests to me that this student has been reading Harold Bloom.

Well remembered, Terence!  Bloom does briefly emphasize the mortal
grossness passage, but he does not see Titania as Hippolyta's dream
image.  The essay I'm looking for argues that the woodland scenes are a
dream forced upon Hippolyta by Theseus in order to "educate" her.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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