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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Re: Chooseth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0878  Thursday, 20 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 19 May 1999 08:54:35 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0876 Re: Chooseth

[2]     From:   Susan C Oldrieve <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 19 May 1999 17:45:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0876 Re: Chooseth

[3]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 19 May 1999 21:34:04 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0876 Re: Chooseth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 19 May 1999 08:54:35 +0000
Subject: 10.0876 Re: Chooseth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0876 Re: Chooseth

>Interestingly,
>Shylock's use of interest is condemned because it breeds wealth, but
>Antonio seems condemned because he cannot breed as Portia can.

Even more interestingly, in my humble opinion, usurers and sodomites
occupy the same circle of Hell in Dante's Inferno.

Cheers,
Seán

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan C Oldrieve <
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Date:           Wednesday, 19 May 1999 17:45:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 10.0876 Re: Chooseth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0876 Re: Chooseth

In support of Ed Taft's comment that

>(1) Bassanio need not be gay for Antonio to fall in love with
>him, and (2) as recent studies have emphasized, bisexuality may have
>been more common in the Renaissance than it is (or appears to be) today.
>Thus, the "love triangle" could still exist, if only in Antonio's mind,
>because since time immemorial, ardent lovers have mistaken friendship
>for love on the part of the beloved,

consider another Antonio-in Twelfth Night.  He also seems to have an
"unrequited" apparently erotic attraction, to the young man Sebastian,
who, like Bassanio, "leaves" Antonio for a woman.

And both Twelfth Night and Merchant leave actors and directors with the
difficult question of what to do with Antonio at the end of the play.

Susan Oldrieve

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 19 May 1999 21:34:04 -0400
Subject: 10.0876 Re: Chooseth
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0876 Re: Chooseth

Two Antonios (Twelfth Night and Merchant of Venice) who love a young man
who seems to reciprocate, then dumps his Antonio for a woman? Any
others?  And goodness, where have I heard this plot before? He pairs
flaws with Claudios too. Does anyone know any other instances of using a
name twice with similar characters?

 

 

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