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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Various Hamlet and Ophelia
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0902  Wednesday, 26 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 May 1999 13:14:04 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.0899 Re: Hamlet, the secret doctrine

[2]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 May 1999 11:46:11 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet's esitating

[3]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 May 1999 11:57:26 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet, the secret doctrine

[4]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 25 May 1999 11:34:23 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: Ophelia


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 May 1999 13:14:04 EDT
Subject: 10.0899 Re: Hamlet, the secret doctrine
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.0899 Re: Hamlet, the secret doctrine

Fort en bras, gentlemen, strong in arms-fort en brah, not fort in
BRASS!!!  (Besides-neither of them sounds the least bit, proleptically
or otherwise, like "Wynton Marsalis"!!

Carol Barton

>>Meanwhile,
>>what do you make of the fact that Fortinbras's name offers a proleptic
>>link to the greatest jazz trumpeter of our century?
>>
>>T. Hawkes

>Surely every jazz trumpeter ever would like to think he had a such a
>mouth?  Wouldn't a better reference be to Ulysses in T&C-"Time
>proleptically hath a [satchel] on his back"-or am I missing something?

>Perplexed In His Works,
>Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 May 1999 11:46:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: Hamlet's esitating

Lucia wrote:

>Claudius is showed ready, though his praying, to be sent to
>hell. Thus all too logical or too formal reasonings about souls'
>destiny are showed fool.

Unfortunately, I so don't understand what you mean by 'soul'.

Lucia, how does your distinction between heaven and hell reflect on the
exchange between Hamlet and Polonius:

P: Will you go out into the air?
H: Into my grave?
P: (Aside)Into air the grave is into the grave..."

>From the last remark, I am inclined to think P is the one who is
>insane, though not mad.

If we allow 'heaven' is 'air' and 'hell' is 'grave' must we not identity
'body' and 'soul'?

Yours in the light,
Dana

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 May 1999 11:57:26 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: Hamlet, the secret doctrine

Robin thanks for finding your way through my numerous spelling errors.
Time being so precious I seldom edit.

Robin wrote:

>>From:           Dana Wilson <
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>>
>>only one man has
>>ever "conceived", that being Zeus to "conceived" Minerva of his
>>mind.

>Oh, dear, what about Sin from Satan's head (admittedly an echo of Z&M)
>in PARADISE LOST?
..."

Are you suggesting that Milton influenced Shakespeare?

I was trying to note that the Minerva influence was conspicuous by
absence in S.

I will try to follow your clues about Bruno, Pico, and Ficino.

As for your reference to Sydney, I believe that a Polar pair may be made
of Sydney's Arcadia and Seymour's Shepard's calendar, which refers to
the Shepard's of Arcardia archetype.

I don't want to bore any one rehashing the work of Henry Lincoln from
Holy Blood Holy Grail; however, I use the Flammel work in my alchemical
research which helps one derive the Florence influences by a French path
to the Paris heresy trials following the condemnation of 1277.

As a question of influence, even in the case of Bruno, Ficino, and Pico,
there is nothing new under the sun.

Yours in the truth,
Dana

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 25 May 1999 11:34:23 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: Ophelia

You wrote:

>Has anyone mentioned that the fact that she is carrying the
>'remembrances' when Hamlet bumps into her is itself an element in
>making him suspicious?

My reading of the scene in question is that she returns some token which
"accompanied" his words.  This does not rule a necklace brooch or ring
which she might have worn at all times.

Yours in the way,
Dana
 

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