1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0909  Thursday, 27 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 May 1999 16:44:55 -0400
        Subj:   Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

[2]     From:   Robert C. Jahncke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 May 1999 09:21:10 EDT
        Subj:   WS's SIR THOMAS MORE


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 May 1999 16:44:55 -0400
Subject:        Tempest and Macbeth Book Titles

A customer of mine is looking for the titles of books which are derived
from either Tempest or Macbeth.  Can anyone think of any off the top of
your head?  Please feel free to respond off list at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick - CD & Video Emporium

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert C. Jahncke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 May 1999 09:21:10 EDT
Subject:        WS's SIR THOMAS MORE

There is a speech that I found in Ted Hughes's THE ESSENTIAL SHAKESPEARE
(Ecco Press, 1991, page 116) that begins, "Grant them removed...."
Hughes cites it as being from a play SIR THOMAS MORE; but I am unable to
find it in anyone's catalog, and Mr. Hughes, alas, is no longer with us.
(Likewise, alas, Mr. Shakespeare.) Perhaps it is a fragment from an
incomplete play, or one that was suppressed as being politically
indiscreet. I use the piece for auditions, where it has never failed to
stump the auditors; but as I am scarcely less stumped myself, I could
use a little help. Also, part of a line from the speech reads,
"You'll...lead the majesty of law in liom, to slip him like a hound." I
can't find the word "liom" in my OED. From the context, I would assume
that the word means "restraint" or "captivity". I would appreciate any
clue as to its definition or derivation, as well, perhaps, as the title
of a good dictionary of Shakespeak.

With thanks,
Robert C. Jahncke

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