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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: May ::
Re: Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.0914  Friday, 28 May 1999.

[1]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 27 May 1999 12:06:50 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet and Ophelia

[2]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 27 May 1999 16:22:04 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Thursday, 27 May 1999 12:06:50 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re: Hamlet and Ophelia

Sean vapoured:

>this is the crux of my argument:  are we to judge philosophies and
>faiths by their historical ramifications?

To which I answer 'O there be players having not the accent of
Christians that have strutted and bellowed so that some thought nature's
journeymen had made them' (H III,i,37)

In my opinion, H in this speech explains to the players why he is so
skilled at theatre.  He warns the player not to perform as if for the
cheap seats, for though he is a player himself that he does is hold the
mirror up to nature.

I think understand the skill of H at theatre is important to
understanding the 'recorder' scene is which H shows the players that
Guildenstern cannot or will not play.

Yours in the craft,
Dana

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Thursday, 27 May 1999 16:22:04 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Hamlet

In Act I, sc i, Hamlet asks Horatio to imagine that a lawyer were lain
in a common grave and then lists a number of receipt devices which are
torn in two or double entered.

First I wonder how this relates to IV,iv, ln37-42 where it refers to he
that made us "looking forward and back" upon "a thought quartered".
This be then to refer to the quartos themselves, in my humble opinion.

Second, I wonder if anyone has any information about the period when the
tradition of using red and black ink to signify debits and credits
respectively arose.

I am,

Yours in the work,
Dana

PS. Sorry about the 'gremlins' (or 'erratae').
 

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