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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
More Shakespeare References
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2113  Thursday, 2 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Hugh Davis <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Dec 1999 09:48:00 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2105 More Shakespeare References

[2]     From:   Douglas Chapman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Dec 1999 10:43:37 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2105 More Shakespeare References

[3]     From:   Enrique de Alba <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Dec 1999 15:26:17 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 29 Nov 1999 to 30 Nov 1999

[4]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Dec 1999 19:57:19 -0800
        Subj:   Politics Goes Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Davis <
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Date:           Wednesday, 01 Dec 1999 09:48:00 EST
Subject: 10.2105 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2105 More Shakespeare References

An episode of the sitcom The Torkelsons, a shortlived show about a
family in rural Oklahoma, focuses on a production of R&J.  In the
episode, "Swear Not By the Moon," Dorothy Jane, the show's protagonist
(who opens each episode by talking with the Man in the Moon) is cast as
Juliet for the school play opposite the boy she pines for.  Unlike most
sitcoms, the two do not fall in love over the course of the play. The
production is the background of the story, made most noteworthy by the
director's decision to set it in the west, since Oklahoma youths would
best appreciate that setting.

Hugh H. Davis

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Chapman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Dec 1999 10:43:37 EST
Subject: 10.2105 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2105 More Shakespeare References

I ran across the following just last night. It is perhaps worth a small
quote:

In Agatha Christie's "Nemesis" Jane Marple, that indefatigable old
British spinster, is thinking of productions of Macbeth she has seen and
has always objected to the way directors stage the witches. She says:
"...if I were ever producing this splendid play, I would make the three
witches <quite> different. I would have them three ordinary, normal old
women. Old Scottish women. They wouldn't dance or caper. They would look
at each other rather slyly and you would feel a sort of menace just
behind the ordinariness of them."

Intriguing, if unstageworthy. Perhaps a movie version?

Douglas Chapman

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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Enrique de Alba <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Dec 1999 15:26:17 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 29 Nov 1999 to 30 Nov 1999 (#1999-45)

Dear SHAKSPERians:

For the record, in case you have not seen it. The movie "Tea with
Mussolini" has several quotes from Shakespeare.

Enrique de Alba

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Dec 1999 19:57:19 -0800
Subject:        Politics Goes Shakespeare

From Salon Magazine's Table Talk:

mary louise - 05:18am Nov 30, 1999 PST (# 2189 of 2293) "I couldn't tell
them the truth, that the media runs the government"-President Clinton to
Dick Morris after speaking to a youth group.

We thought we'd already read the silliest thing we'd read about a book
all year. It was a comment penned by-who else-Frank Bruni, the press
corps' chief worshipper of Governor Bush.
The Daily Howler

As we've mentioned before, just the headlines that have run over Bruni's
stories this year would make a great comedy piece. In fact, his headline
writer was back in action last week, fawning again on page one:

NEW YORK TIMES HEADLINE: Levity Is at the Soul Of Bush, the Puck In the
Political Pack

Maybe that's what makes Bush's story so gripping-the fact that he's
straight out of Shakespeare. (NOTE: The fact that the Times has covered
Bush in a comical way is no reflection on Governor Bush.)
 

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