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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Rhetoric: A Question (III)
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2139  Monday, 6 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Bob Haas <
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        Date:   Friday, 03 Dec 1999 22:57:34 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[2]     From:   Nancy Taylor <
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        Date:   Friday, 03 Dec 1999 23:06:20 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[3]     From:   Sara Vandenberg <
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        Date:   Sat, 4 Dec 1999 00:21:04 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[4]     From:   Dave Crosby <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 08:30:10 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[5]     From:   Douglas Abel <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 05:42:28 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[6]     From:   Peter Berek <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 12:05:21 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[7]     From:   Robert Peters <
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        Date:   Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 18:05:19 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[8]     From:   Jay Johnson <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 13:55:52 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[9]     From:   Gerda Grice <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 15:56:45 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Haas <
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Date:           Friday, 03 Dec 1999 22:57:34 -0500
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Might you be thinking of dianoea, which is the use of animated questions
and answers in  developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent
of anthypophora, where an individual quickly asks and then answers his
own questions).

See The Forest of Rhetoric (at
http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/search.htm) very handy for such
concerns.  But this might not be the answer you were looking for.  Hope
it helps.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Taylor <
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Date:           Friday, 03 Dec 1999 23:06:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

I think the term you're looking for is stichomythia, developed first in
early Greek drama.

Nancy Taylor
Tufts University

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Vandenberg <
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Date:           Sat, 4 Dec 1999 00:21:04 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

You may be referring to stichomythia, the form of dialogue found in the
intense exchanges in episodes of Greek tragedy as well as in subsequent
drama.  When the exchange consists of comic insults in Renaissance
plays, I think the term used is "flyting."  Such insults are like tennis
volleys, but may be more than one line each.

Sara van den Berg

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dave Crosby <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 08:30:10 -0600
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Dear Joanne,

I think the term you're looking for is "stichomythia."

Dave Crosby

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Abel <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 05:42:28 -0700
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

The rapid-fire, one-line-at-a-time dialogue is called stichomythia.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Berek <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 12:05:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Stychomythia.  Peter Berek

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Peters <
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Date:           Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 18:05:19 +0100
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

The term is "stichomythia" (the Greek words sticho and mythos meaning
"order" and "word". If two characters exchange double lines it is called
"destichomythia", using half lines you say hestimomythia. I guess
there

 

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