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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Rhetoric: A Question (IV)
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2140  Monday, 6 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 17:16:45 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[2]     From:   Louis Marder <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 17:28:11 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[3]     From:   Alice Jane Cooley <
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        Date:   Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 20:39:37 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Rhetoric: A Question

[4]     From:   Anne-Julia Zwierlein <
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        Date:   Sunday,, 5 Dec 1999 11:47:13 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Rhetoric: A Question

[5]     From:   Louis Marder <
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        Date:   Sunday,, 5 Dec 1999 13:19:14 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[6]     From:   Brother Anthony <
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        Date:   Monday, 06 Dec 1999 09:12:37 +0900
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[7]     From:   Peter Groves <
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        Date:   Monday, 06 Dec 1999 13:04:17 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

[8]     From:   Anne C. Lounsbury <
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        Date:   Sunday,, 5 Dec 1999 22:56:09 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 17:16:45 -0600
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Joanne asked:

> A colleague posed the following question, and I didn't have immediate
> resources to hand. >>Do you know the name of the kind of dialogue that
> is a "tennis volley" with a single line by each participant (usually
> two) given in rapid succession?>>

Stichomythia.

Happy weekend, all.

Chris Gordon

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 17:28:11 -0600
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Dear Joanna:  I just spent a full hour looking for the figure of speech
that you are looking for.  I used it in teaching; I called it "verbal
fencing."  But I'm getting old and just can't think of it now.  And I
can't find the book that has the answer. I almost couldn't think of the
author.  It is Shakespeare's Imagery and what it tells us by Caroline
Spurgeon.  She gives about 250 of Shakespeare' s figures, but of course
I used to tell my students that Shakespeare didn't know them by name.
Everyone uses similes and metaphors without knowing that they are
standard figures of speech.  Anyway, you are a big girl now and should
be
able to find Spurgeon in a good library.  I mentioned getting old.  But
one has to get old because one needs so much time to think of what he
knows.  Let me know how you make out.  I'll keeping thinking about you
and write again as soon as I think of the word.     Louis Marder,
Shakespeare Data Bank, 
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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alice Jane Cooley <
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Date:           Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 20:39:37 -0500
Subject:        Re: Rhetoric: A Question

It's got a beautiful Greek name: stichomythia. It is also sometimes
described as "cut and parry" dialogue-a little more vicious than the
tennis metaphor!

Alice Cooley

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anne-Julia Zwierlein <
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Date:           Sunday,, 5 Dec 1999 11:47:13 +0100
Subject:        Re: Rhetoric: A Question

Dear Joanne,

The term is 'STICHOMYTHIA'.

Yours sincerely,
Anne-Julia Zwierlein, University of Muenster

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
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Date:           Sunday,, 5 Dec 1999 13:19:14 -0600
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Dear Joanne: Next morning:  The mind is a wonderful thing:  I don't
forget anything:  but it takes long sometimes to remember.  The figure
of speech you are seeking is Stichomythia or stichomuthia.  See for
example The Comedy of Errors - II.1.10-15 and  26-32.  I hope this
helps.  Louis Marder  
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[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brother Anthony <
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Date:           Monday, 06 Dec 1999 09:12:37 +0900
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Stichomythia (aka 'cut and thrust' or 'cut and parry')

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <
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Date:           Monday, 06 Dec 1999 13:04:17 +1100
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

If the dialogue is limited to one line per speech-turn, it's called
stichomythia.  The Richard and Anne example is interesting because the
earlier exchanges are single pentameters, batted back and forth indeed
like a tennis volley, but the final stretch (where she relents) is a
co-operative exchange of trimeters, where the second completes the line
strated by the first to make an alexandrine: "I would I knew thy heart.
/ 'Tis figured in my face" etc.

Peter Groves,
Department of English,
Monash University

[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anne C. Lounsbury <
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Date:           Sunday,, 5 Dec 1999 22:56:09 EST
Subject: 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2136 Rhetoric: A Question

Re Joanne Walen's question, such dialogue is stichomythia.  Some other
practitioners are Katharina and Petruchio (II.i "Myself am mov'd . . . )
and Beatrice and Benedick.  Helena and Hermia do it (I.i) in rhyming
couplets:

    Hermia      I frown upon him, yet he loves me still!
    Helena      O that your frowns would teach my smiles such skill!
    Hermia      I give him curses, yet he gives me love.
    Helena      O that my prayers could such affection move!

 . . . and so on for several lines more. . . .
 

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