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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Stichomythia
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2157  Tuesday, 7 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Joanne Walen <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Dec 1999 10:52:24 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2138 Rhetoric: A Question

[2]     From:   Ron Dwelle <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Dec 1999 12:33:05 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2140 Re: Rhetoric: A Question (IV)

[3]     From:   Stefan Kirby <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Dec 1999 01:06:40 -0800
        Subj:   Stichomythia


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Walen <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Dec 1999 10:52:24 EST
Subject: 10.2138 Rhetoric: A Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2138 Rhetoric: A Question

Thank you ALL for the responses to my question on rhetoric. I will never
again need a reference for stichomythia.

Joanne Walen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Dwelle <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Dec 1999 12:33:05 -0500
Subject: 10.2140 Re: Rhetoric: A Question (IV)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2140 Re: Rhetoric: A Question (IV)

Actually, I suspect Shakespeare did know the figures by name-learning
such figures was a common drill for schoolboys in good schools like
those at Stratford.

Shakespeare used countless variations on stichomythia. One of the most
interesting and dramatically ironic is the repartee between Iago and
Desdemona (or between Iago and himself) in II, i. It seems as though
Iago is showing off-he's as capable as the super-subtle Venetians (and
Elizabethans) like Cassio and Desdemona, who would have learned such
devices in their normal training. He's playing on both sides of the net.

>She gives about 250 of Shakespeare' s figures, but of course
>I used to tell my students that Shakespeare didn't know them by name

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stefan Kirby <
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Date:           Tuesday, 07 Dec 1999 01:06:40 -0800
Subject:        Stichomythia

I just learned a new word! And thanks to at least 40 other people
(diligent people; quick on their toes, they are!), I shall not soon
forget it.

Thank you all,
Stefan Kirby
 

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