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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Latin Pronunciation
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2175  Thursday, 9 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Tom Bishop <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Dec 1999 10:22:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

[2]     From:   Joseph Tate <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Dec 1999 11:08:46 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

[3]     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Dec 1999 19:43:58 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

[4]     From:   Dale Coye <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Dec 1999 13:42:55 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

[5]     From:   Peter Groves <
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        Date:   Thursday, 09 Dec 1999 12:24:14 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

[6]     From:   Fran Barasch <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Dec 1999 08:54:43 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Dec 1999 10:22:00 -0500
Subject: 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

Derek Attridge's "Well-Weighed Syllables" (1974) has a chapter on this
question.  There may also be more recent discussions, esp among
musicologists.

TB

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph Tate <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Dec 1999 11:08:46 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

Try Derek Attridge's book *Well-Weighed Syllables: Elizabethan verse in
classical metres.* He discusses Elizabethan Latin pronunciation.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Dec 1999 19:43:58 GMT
Subject: 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

There are some useful brief remarks on the question of Elizabethan Latin
Pronunciation in Derek Attridge's book on the attempts to write English
quantitative verse entitle Well-Weighed Syllables (Cambridge, 1974) -
though I am sure others will know of more substantial and recent work in
this area.

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Coye <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 Dec 1999 13:42:55 EST
Subject: 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

In my Pronouncing Shakespeare's Words (Greenwood 1998) I give both
restored Latin and traditional Anglo-Latin versions of all the Latin in
Shakespeare (hic jacet  would be /hick JAY sit/ in Anglo-Latin.  In the
back there is a short bibliography of articles that were helpful to me
in this.  One source was Sidney Allen's  Vox Latina, where there is a
short history of the change in Latin pronunciation.   The main point is
that Latin took part in the Great Vowel Shift and all the other changes
that English was subjected to over the centuries.  So wherever the
English vowels were at Shakespeare's time, the Latin vowels were there
too.

Dale Coye
The College of NJ

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <
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Date:           Thursday, 09 Dec 1999 12:24:14 +1100
Subject: 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

> I wonder whether anyone knows of a source for information on the
> pronunciation of Latin in Elizabethan England? I'm involved in a
> production of Lyly's Woman in the Moon, in which various Latin tags are
> thrown around, and we thought it would be nice, since we have to teach
> the actors how to pronounce the Latin anyway, if we could base the
> pronunciation on something authentic to the period. I'd be grateful for
> any insights.
>
See Derek Attridge, _Well-weigh'd Syllables_ (CUP 1973)

Peter Groves,
Department of English,
Monash University

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Barasch <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Dec 1999 08:54:43 EST
Subject: 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2168 Latin Pronunciation

To Alice Cooley: Many moons ago, my Latin teacher said that, as no
record of classical Latin survived, each nation or locality pronounced
it in accordance with its own usage.  If that is correct, then
Elizabethan Latin would have had an Elizabethan anglo-latin sound.
Best, Fran Barasch
 

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