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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Literary Terminology 2
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2203  Tuesday, 14 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Michael Cohen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Dec 1999 11:37:10 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2

[2]     From:   Bradley Ryner <
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        Date:   Thursday, 09 Dec 1999 18:10:01 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2

[3]     From:   Stefan Kirby <
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        Date:   Friday, 10 Dec 1999 23:50:12 -0800
        Subj:   literary terminology 2

[4]     From:   Armando Guerra" <
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        Date:   Saturday, 11 Dec 1999 03:16:25 -0600
        Subj:   literary terminology 2

[5]     From:   Peter Groves <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Dec 1999 13:51:57 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Cohen <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Dec 1999 11:37:10 -0800
Subject: 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2

>For all those who helped with Stick O'Mythia, here's another...
>
>Is there a term for the reversal of key words in a well-known phrase, as
>in Mae West's "A hard man is good to find"?

Sounds a bit like hypallage "Awkward or humorous changing of agreement
or application of words.... Sometimes used to describe a deliberately
misapplied epithet, as when, in a well-rehearsed mistake, Churchill
referred to the 'infernal combustion engine.'" Handlist of Rhetorical
Terms, Richard Lanham, 1996 (Hypercard version)

Or how about, "joke"?

Michael E. Cohen
<mailto:
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 >http://members.aol.com/lymond/

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bradley Ryner <
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Date:           Thursday, 09 Dec 1999 18:10:01 -0600
Subject: 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2188 Literary Terminology 2

I want to call it "spoonerism" though I'm not sure if that's the correct
spelling, and might only apply to the transposition of letters "Tons of
Soil" / "Sons of Toil" is in my head for some reason).

This might be the question which would put me out of the running to
become a millionaire.

Brad Ryner

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stefan Kirby <
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Date:           Friday, 10 Dec 1999 23:50:12 -0800
Subject:        literary terminology 2

I don't suppose this would count as a "Spoonerism"? (particularly as it
is an intentional reversal...)

-Stefan Kirby

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Armando Guerra" <
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Date:           Saturday, 11 Dec 1999 03:16:25 -0600
Subject:        literary terminology 2

Dear Skip Nicholson,

I think the term for that is "broken set expression"-some other people
call it "decomposition of set expressions." It consists, as you said, in
reviving (for some effect) the independent meaning(s) of the parts that
make up the set expression. Hope this helps somewhat. Cheers,

Armando Guerra V

 

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