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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Literary Terminology 2
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2220  Wednesday, 15 December 1999.

From:           Nancy Charlton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Dec 1999 19:45:55 -0500
Subject: 10.2203 Re: Literary Terminology 2
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2203 Re: Literary Terminology 2

I think those who pull for "hypallage" are correct.  A spoonerism is
switching of opening consonants, or sometimes vowel sounds.  The name
honors the Rev. Spooner, so the story goes, whose bloopers in this
regard cracked up his congregation.  A prize example was when he
announced the hymn " Kinquering Congs Their Tatles Tike."  And in
berating a young miscreant he said "you must wo agay on the town drain."

As a youngster I looked forward every week to The Saturday Evening Post-
the real one, not the current watered down shade- because I loved the
fiction, the cartoons, and the humor page which for awhile had a story
told in spooneristic language.

But my vote for hypallage comes after perusing the Silva Rhetoricae, an
excellent web site edited by Dr. Gideon Burton of Brigham Young
University.  The left hand frame, "Trees," has an outline of clickable
links to a number of short essays on classical rhetoric; the center
frame, "Forest," holds the introduction and search engine; and the right
hand one is "Flowers," an alphabetical list of terms used in rhetoric,
with cross references and examples.

It was here that Bottom's speech is given as an example of hypallage:

The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of
man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to
taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to
report, what my dream was.

The editor notes that this is also a misquoting of scripture (I Cor.
2:9., to be exact.)  Made me think of Mrs. Malaprop.

Another example, closer to the one that sparked this thread, is this:

Darksome wandering by the solitary night
(instead of "Solitary wandering by the darksome night") -- Angel Day

The URL for the Silva Rhetoricae is
http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/silva.htm

Just thought of another hypallage:  'I'll take my sails out of his
wind.'

Nancy Charlton
 

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