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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Parents and Children in *Macbeth*
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2273  Wednesday, 22 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Anthony Burton <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Dec 1999 13:14:23 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2260 Parents and Children in *Macbeth*

[2]     From:   Richard Regan <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Dec 1999 23:21:46 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2260 Parents and Children in *Macbeth*


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Burton <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Dec 1999 13:14:23 -0800
Subject: 10.2260 Parents and Children in *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2260 Parents and Children in *Macbeth*

I find Sean Lawrence's remark about Macbeth being the only major
character lacking both a father and a son to be pregnant with
stimulating implications.  The same remark may be made about, say,
Othello.  And in both cases, the characters have a major catalytic
effect on the world they inhabit, as the terminators of an existing
historical current, transgressing and transforming the present, but not
participating in the future they prepared.   We can see very much the
same thing with Moses (the name-element m-s-h/s is Egyptian and means
"son of", as in Rameses, Tutmoses, etc., so the absence of a paternal
name-or perhaps the significance of the blank space to indicate the
ineffable name of God- highlights the paternity issue in a way that
converges neatly with Sean's observation.  Do I smell an archetype?  A
secret metaphysical tradition outside the exclusivity of
Catholic-Protestant dualism?   A sign of, gulp, authorial meaning?   I
grow faint at the enormity of my heresy.   No, no, this must be an
arbitrary trick of my subjectivity and circumstances; Sean L must have
grown up in New York City in the 40's to perceive the same fantastic
apparitions.  May no one else be drawn into our hellish maelstrom.  And
a delightful millenium to you all.

Tony B

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Regan <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Dec 1999 23:21:46 EST
Subject: 10.2260 Parents and Children in *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2260 Parents and Children in *Macbeth*

Sean Lawrence asks some interesting questions about paternal patterns in
Shakespeare's later plays. Has anyone considered the effect of the death
of Shakespeare's mother on the romances? The effect of his father's and
son's deaths are often remarked on concerning Hamlet.

Richard Regan
Fairfield University
 

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