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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Iago's Name
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2285  Thursday, 23 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Dec 1999 13:32:17 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2268 Re: Iago's Name

[2]     From:   Alberto Cacicedo <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Dec 1999 15:12:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2268 Re: Iago's Name


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Dec 1999 13:32:17 -0500
Subject: 10.2268 Re: Iago's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2268 Re: Iago's Name

Martin Mueller commented

>I'm probably influenced by Goethe's novel Elective Affinities. The most
>mysterious
>character in that odd novel is a woman who also ends in a quasi-suicidal
>death. Her name is Ottilie.  Goethe in Wilhelm Meister did a lot to turn
>Ophelia into a modern mythological character. Ottilie clearly is another
>Ophelia.

I believe that Ottilie is a not uncommon modern Germanic name, the
feminization of Otto, and has not relation to Ophelia other than the
monogram.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alberto Cacicedo <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Dec 1999 15:12:48 -0500
Subject: 10.2268 Re: Iago's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2268 Re: Iago's Name

During the 500th anniversary of Columbus's "discovery," I went to one of
the Smithsonian exhibits commemorating the event, and saw a statuette of
Santiago-the saint of Compostela-in the act of battling some Moors.
The title of the statue was "Santiago Matamoros," or Santiago Moor
Killer.  Whether Shakespeare was familiar with the fact that the
Christian reconquista of the Iberian peninsula was conducted under the
banner of Santiago Matamoros I cannot know, of course-but the death of
the Moor of Venice certainly takes place under the influence of another
Matamoros.

Al Cacicedo
Albright College
 

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