Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: December ::
Re: Goofy Test Answers
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2299  Wednesday, 29 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Bob Linn <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 23 Dec 1999 13:24:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2284 Re: Goofy Test Answers

[2]     From:   Louis Marder <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 25 Dec 1999 10:29:47 -0600
        Subj:   Re: Goofy Test Answers

[3]     From:   Karin Youngberg <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 27 Dec 1999 12:20:07 -0600
        Subj:   goofy answers


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Linn <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 23 Dec 1999 13:24:54 -0500
Subject: 10.2284 Re: Goofy Test Answers
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2284 Re: Goofy Test Answers

For Goofy Test answers: A colleague of mine received the following
answer on a recent final.  The question was "How did the plains Indians
use buffalo?"  The answer:  "The Indians used buffalo for food and for
significant others."  Not Shakespeare, but thought provoking.

Bob Linn

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 25 Dec 1999 10:29:47 -0600
Subject:        Re: Goofy Test Answers

I listed a few of the goofy answers in The Shakespeare Newsletter about
30 years ago.  I have no time to go back to find them, but  one I do
remember.  On an identification question I asked about the "beast with
two backs" in Othello. One female student gave an answer which prompted
me to return her paper with a comment to explain the answer to me me
after class.  She said the beast was obviously "a camel" seen by Othello
on his travels  .Did YOU ever think of that?  Louis Marder, Shakespeare
Data Bank 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karin Youngberg <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 27 Dec 1999 12:20:07 -0600
Subject:        goofy answers

Here's one from my TA days:

A student was responding to an essay question regarding right vs.
reality in the RII. He tried to reproduce the lecturer's distinction
between de jure and de facto. It came out like this:

"Bolingbrook held the crown de facto, but Richard II was king au jus (by
blood)."
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.