1999

Re: Doctored Facsimiles

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2147  Monday, 6 December 1999.

From:           Robert Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 16:35:46 -0000
Subject: 10.2134 Doctored Facsimiles
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2134 Doctored Facsimiles

Can anyone on the list comment on the quality of the Internet versions
of the First Folio in relation to Yale and Hinman?

Shakespeare First Folio toc (Brandeis University Special Collections)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/facs?lookup

and

Browse the Shakespeare First Folio Collection
http://etext.virginia.edu/shakespeare/folio/foliobrowse.html

and

furness shakespeare library
http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/index.html

I don't know what's the relation of these various etexts to each other,
and whether there are any more on the Web.

Robin Hamilton

Re: Shakespeare and Milton

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2146  Monday, 6 December 1999.

From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 3 Dec 1999 23:05:38 -0600
Subject: 10.2132 Re: Shakespeare and Milton
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2132 Re: Shakespeare and Milton

Nancy Charlton wrote:

>Dom Saliani responded to Roy Flannagan's posting:
>
>>I shared Roy Flannagan's post concerning Shakespeare and Milton with a
>>friend Nina Green, who is interested in this period. In her response to
>>the posting, she cautions Flannagan on the identity of Alice Spencer:
>>
>>> Alice Spencer was the widow of Ferdinando
>>> Stanley (d.1594), Lord Strange and Earl of Derby, not the widow of the Sir
>>> Edward Stanley whose tomb is at Tong.
>
>Would Lady Alice have been a Spencer of the Herberts and Spencers of
>Penshurst?

She was the daughter of Sir John Spencer of Althorpe, Northamptonshire.
I don't know offhand whether there's any connection.

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2144  Monday, 6 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 03 Dec 1999 14:27:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2129 Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign

[2]     From:   Graham Bradshaw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 16:21:44 +0900
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2129 Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 03 Dec 1999 14:27:15 -0500
Subject: 10.2129 ESHK 10.2129 Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2129 ESHK 10.2129 Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign

I recently came across a beautifully bound 14 volume set of the Works,
printed on superb velum with color and B&W prints, published in London
in 1907.  The principal editors were said to be Henry Irving and Frank
Marshall, although I think Irving pretty much admitted that he was just
lending his name to the venture.

Each of the plays is preceded by a fairly scholarly introduction and
followed by impressive text notes.  The text notes to most of the plays
are headed by maps of the action.  The few I looked at seemed to be more
detailed (although smaller) than Asimov's maps.

Unfortunately, one of the volumes was missing and two had been
thoroughly destroyed by larvae, who were e'en at it.  Otherwise, I would
have made an offer.  Does anyone know anything about this edition?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Bradshaw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 16:21:44 +0900
Subject: 10.2129 ESHK 10.2129 Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2129 ESHK 10.2129 Re: Map of Henry V's Campaign

The historical issue of maps is obviously being dealt with. But, so far
as Shakespeare's Henry V is concerned, there is another, closely related
but largely undiscussed issue. I tried to make sense of it in my book
"Misrepresentations", but others may have done better, before or since.

The "issue" is this. The Chorus in "Henry V" studiously corrects the
play's own representation of "history", by reminding the audience that
after the famous victory at Agincourt, Henry returned to England, time
passed, etc. etc. And of course the Chorus never so much as acknowledges
the existence of the play's low-life characters, like Pistol, or even
that other (medieval, rather than Elizabethan) amateur historian,
Fluellen.

But of course in Act 5 the play, which in every earlier act has defied
the Chorus, jauntily proceeds in a quite different (much more Brechtian)
direction after the Agincourt victory. Although the Chorus insists on
historical truth, as filtered through his own "take-me-to-your leader"
version of what history is (and isn't), Shakespeare's fifth act begins
in a gloriously defiant or insouciant fashion-by returning us to France,
and the dispute between Pistol and Fluellen (another
take-me-to-your-leader amateur historian), as though no time had passed,
and as though the victorious English somehow went on  directly from
Agincourt to confront the French king. This provocation is quite
extraordinary, isn't it?

The fifth act then consists of two scenes, or stage a kind of dramatic
diptych.

First, we see Fluellen, the "English" Welshman (where are you,
Terence?), beating up Pistol. Alas, the sentimental puerilities of
Olivier's and Branagh's battle scenes distort and obscure and pervert
(money, money, money) what is so remarkable in SHakespeare's play: there
aren't any battle scenes. The only scenes in which blood is shed onstage
are (i) the scene where Henry gives the order to cut the throats of
defenceless French prisoners, and (ii) the scene where Fluellen cracks
Pistol's skull with an "English" cudgel. Neither scene is heroic. Modern
productions either (i) soften the Fluellen/Pistol scene by making the
beating far less severe than the text shows it to be, or (ii) cut it
altogether-like Branagh, the most puerile and unreflective of all
revered Shakespeare film directors. Cutting the scene of course
eliminates the challenge of the Shakespearean diptych, which next shows
another Welsh-born "English" lout beating up the King of France, not by
cracking his skull, but by raping his country and daughter.

Modern ways of staging, or NOT staging, the final scene of this
play-while interpolating silly/sentimental battle scenes, which
Shakespeare could write and sometimes, but not in this crucial
instance-seem to me to epitomise the modern refusal to engage with
Shakespeare's play and its historiographical challenge. Requesting the
"maps" may well be, although I don't want to prejudge, another part of
that impoverishing enterpise. I hope it isn't.

Cheers,
Graham Bradshaw

3 Women

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2145  Monday, 6 December 1999.

From:           Sarah Boswell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 04 Dec 1999 10:57:27 +1300
Subject:        3 Women

Hi there, I'm looking for a classical play to do for my graduation show.
The catch is that my whole class consists of just three women, one 20,
one 21 and one 50.  Can anyone think of a play that we could do (besides
Genet's The Maids).  I'm just about at the stage of tearing my hair out
so your input would most definitely be appreciated!

Kind Regards
Sarah Boswell - New Zealand
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

"To be, or not to be"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2143  Monday, 6 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 03 Dec 1999 14:03:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

[2]     From:   James P. Lusardi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 03 Dec 1999 15:00:06 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

[3]     From:   Jerry Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 3 Dec 1999 15:05:31 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

[4]     From:   Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 3 Dec 1999 16:30:15 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   To Be Or Not To Be

[5]     From:   Arthur D L Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 10:30:41 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 03 Dec 1999 14:03:52 -0500
Subject: 10.2126 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

John Velz wrote:

> In a film titled "To Be or Not To Be" Mel Brooks plays a ham Polish (not
> Polish ham!) actor who loves to do highlights from Hamlet.

This picture is actually a remake of an Ernst Lubitsch picture by the
same name (c. 1940, when it was far more evocative) starring Jack Benny
and, I believe, Jean Harlow.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James P. Lusardi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 03 Dec 1999 15:00:06 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 10.2126 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

Dear John V.:

The first film version featured Jack Benny and a wonderful cast back in
1939.

Yours--Jim Lusardi

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 3 Dec 1999 15:05:31 -0600
Subject: 10.2126 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

>In a film titled "To Be or Not To Be" Mel Brooks plays a ham Polish (not
>Polish ham!) actor who loves to do highlights from Hamlet.

I'm sure I won't be the only one to point out that this is a remake of a
Jack Benny film of the same name. The original was funnier, in my
opinion.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 3 Dec 1999 16:30:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        To Be Or Not To Be

John Velz rightly recommends Mel Brooks' film "To Be or Not to Be," but
it fails to match the 1942 Ernst Lubitsch original.  Brooks stuck pretty
close to Edwin Justus Mayer's story, but could not repeat the film
chemistry of Jack Benny and Carole Lombard or the inspired ensemble work
of the supporting Hollywood clowns.  Even the very young and very stiff
Robert Stack is effective.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur D L Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 4 Dec 1999 10:30:41 +0800
Subject: 10.2126 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2126 More Shakespeare References

The Mel Brooks 'To Be or Not To Be' is a remake of the (superior) Jack
Benny/Carole Lombard original, 1942,directed by Ernst Lubitsch and
written by Edwin Justus Mayer.

Arthur Lindley

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