1999

Re: Shakespeare Performed Sky High

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2127  Friday, 3 December 1999.

From:           Edward Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 02 Dec 1999 11:25:41 -0500
Subject: 10.2118 Shakespeare Performed Sky High
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2118 Shakespeare Performed Sky High

Ironically, just a few blocks away, on 8th Ave, the Judith Shakespeare
Company was performing its concert reading of TITUS to an enthralled
audience of roughly 100.    Not the mass audience of Times Square, but
one that was hard to match for its attentiveness and delight.

We live in curious times.

Ed Pixley
SUNY-Oneonta

More Shakespeare References

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2126  Friday, 3 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 2 Dec 1999 11:06:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2113 More Shakespeare References

[2]     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 03 Dec 1999 02:25:30 -0600
        Subj:   More Shakespeare References


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 2 Dec 1999 11:06:46 -0500
Subject: 10.2113 More Shakespeare References
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2113 More Shakespeare References

Most of the pop culture references name-check either Hamlet or
R&J-which, in a sense, metonymize (is that a verb?) Shakespeare and
therefore stand for Culture.

It's interesting that Hamlet and Juliet are perhaps the only two
characters in the canon who have a "uniform"-Hamlet's black doublet and
tights, white shirt, and Big Gold (suitable for hanging miniature
portraits); skull optional for still photos; and Juliet's crocheted
mini- or micro-snood.  For example, if you decided to go to a costume
party as Hotspur or Beatrice or Falstaff or Lady Macbeth, you'd have to
do a lot of explaining. If there were such a thing as a Listserv costume
party, we would all be familiar with the characters, but would probably
disagree about their appearance and wardrobe.

I'll be the one in the bear suit,
Dana (Shilling)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 03 Dec 1999 02:25:30 -0600
Subject:        More Shakespeare References

In a film titled "To Be or Not To Be" Mel Brooks plays a ham Polish (not
Polish ham!) actor who loves to do highlights from Hamlet.  When he gets
to the "To be or not to be" soliloquy each night, a young Polish Air
Force officer gets up and pushes his way out of his place in row x (same
seat each night) and slips backstage to pay court to the actor's
flirtatious wife, Ann Bancroft.  In this delicious farce, Shakespeare
gets all mixed up with the Gestapo after Poland is invaded and with the
underground, and there are some improbable escapes and even more
improbable deceptions of the stupid Gestapo.  I first saw the film in
Germany, where it was shown with German subtitles.  The people I watched
with roared with laughter but how much the laughter was at the forced
interp of Hamlet and how much was at the satire of the Gestapo one
cannot say.  The film was shown on satellite t.v. this week past.  A
good farce and worth seeing.

John Velz

Re: Lechery

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2124  Friday, 3 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 02 Dec 1999 11:23:50 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Lechery

[2]     From:   Edward Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 02 Dec 1999 11:12:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2107 Re: Lechery

[3]     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Fri, 3 Dec 1999 10:57:25 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2116 Re: Lechery


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 02 Dec 1999 11:23:50 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Lechery

Dave Evett's account of how Kathleen Widdowes and William Hutt played MM
4.1 is delightfully suggestive, though I, like Dave, have a hard time
seeing the Duke as a guy who likes martinis (or Mariana, either, for
that matter).  The classic BBC production of MM gives the opposite
interpretation: this Duke makes it clear that Lucio's slanders are
indeed slanders and not at all true.

Two further quick points: I saw William Hutt play Falstaff in Merry
Wives at Stratford, Ont. (1977?), and he was absolutely superb.  Second,
there is a new book soon to be published on Measure for Measure, written
by our mutual friend Bob Bennett, entitled Romance and Reformation. In
Chapter 3, Bob argues that the real reason that Vincentio has not
enforced the law in Vienna is that his ethos-his reputation for goodness
and probity) has been tarnished "by calumny, his sexual adventures
invented and rumored about by Lucio or his kind" (79). Bob supports his
view by pointing to 1.2.1-6 in which Friar Thomas assumes that Vincentio
is at the monastery for purposes of an assignation (!)  The Duke is at
some pains to explain that this is not so!  Bob further argues that this
is the point where the Duke fully realizes what he is up against and how
hard he will have to work to right the ship of state in Vienna.

It's an intriguing argument, don't you think?

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 02 Dec 1999 11:12:40 -0500
Subject: 10.2107 Re: Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2107 Re: Lechery

> Ed Taft writes:
>
> > Mike Friedman's observation that Lucio is a "lech" is a good one that is
> > often missed.  This is because Lucio is a "hail-fellow-well-met" type
> > who, at first, we have some affection for.  After all, he does want to
> > save Claudio's life and seems like a good friend to both Isabella and
> > her brother. But there is another side to Lucio, as Mike points out, he
> > is irresponsible in his sexual life, and he also uses lower-class women.
>
> I think that one reason he seems to be liked is that he's a rebel, and a
> carnivalesque rebel at that, so it's assumed that he must be in keeping
> with some sort of dissident agenda.  Lucio, in fact, strikes me as a
> very good example of how mere dissidence is not in itself a worthwhile
> goal.
>
> Cheers,
> Se


Re: The Language of Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2125  Friday, 3 December 1999.

From:           Jonathan Hope <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 02 Dec 1999 15:31:08 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 10.2112 The Language of Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2112 The Language of Shakespeare

The best place to start is Charles Barber's Early Modern English (2nd ed
1997: Edinburgh).  There's a collection of reprinted articles on
Shakespeare's language edited by Vivian Salmon and Edwina Burness:
Reader in the Language of Shakespearean Drama (1986[?] John Benjamins).

Briefer coverage of most of the topics in Barber can be found in my
chapter 'Shakespeare's "natiue Englishe"' in David Scott Kastan (ed)
Companion to Shakespeare (1998 Blackwell).  hope you enjoy your work!

Best,
Jonathan Hope
Middlesex University

Shakespeare and Brave New World

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2123  Thursday, 2 December 1999.

From:           Perry Herzfeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 2 Dec 1999 21:37:12 +1100
Subject:        Shakespeare and Brave New World

This may have been discussed before, but I am wondering what others
think of the continual references to Shakespeare and quotes from him
throughout Aldus Huxley's "Brave New World".  Indeed, the title itself
is a Shakespeare quote.  At times I think "the savage's" use of
Shakespearean dialogue works well, highlighting Shakespeare's emotion
and infinite variety with the world's sterility and "stability".
However, it does tend to be a bit incessant at times.  Was Huxley a
Shakespeare buff himself?  Is there any well-known criticism on this
subject?

Yours, in the hope of further discussion,
Perry Herzfeld.

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