1999

Summer Stratford (UK) Course

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2108  Wednesday, 1 December 1999.

From:           Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 16:00:47 EST
Subject:        Summer Stratford (UK) Course

The 5th annual Shakespeare in Stratford (UK): Text and Theater course is
set for 11-17 June, 2000, offering seminars on text and performance with
scholars from the Shakespeare Centre and Institute (University of
Birmingham) and actors from the Royal Shakespeare Company, covering five
plays. The fee covers lodging in Stratford-upon-Avon guesthouses, all
breakfasts, 4 dinners, all tickets, entrance and class fees, but not
airfare. $900, with every possibility of a healthy fee reduction once
ticket prices are set. Specific plays will be announced in January.
Course is limited to 15 participants, on a first-come basis. Contact:
Joanne Walen, Shakespeare Express, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for further
information.

Re: Lechery

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2107  Wednesday, 1 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 21:38:05 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2096 Re: Lechery

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 18:49:39 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2096 Re: Lechery


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 21:38:05 +0100
Subject: 10.2096 Re: Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2096 Re: Lechery

> Manuela Rossini writes:
>
> "The question 'How many men did Joan sleep with?' is as irrelevant as
> the number of Lady Macbeth's off-spring. We are dealing with texts here.
> ...  The play constructs precisely this either-or reality for the
> heroine."
>
> If a play that has NO agency can construct a reality, then surely Joan
> can have intercourse with as many men as she wishes, and the number may
> tell us something about her (as a literary character, not as a real
> woman).
>
> Yours, Bill Godshalk

She cannot "have" - she can only "have had": but then, should we believe
the words of a witch - just because they would make her a bitch?
Bewitchmaster General, Markus Marti

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 18:49:39 -0800
Subject: 10.2096 Re: Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2096 Re: Lechery

Ed Taft writes:

> Mike Friedman's observation that Lucio is a "lech" is a good one that is
> often missed.  This is because Lucio is a "hail-fellow-well-met" type
> who, at first, we have some affection for.  After all, he does want to
> save Claudio's life and seems like a good friend to both Isabella and
> her brother. But there is another side to Lucio, as Mike points out, he
> is irresponsible in his sexual life, and he also uses lower-class women.

I think that one reason he seems to be liked is that he's a rebel, and a
carnivalesque rebel at that, so it's assumed that he must be in keeping
with some sort of dissident agenda.  Lucio, in fact, strikes me as a
very good example of how mere dissidence is not in itself a worthwhile
goal.

Cheers,
Se


More Shakespeare References

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2105  Wednesday, 1 December 1999.

[1]     From:   C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 11:35:57 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.2104 Re: More References in Mass Culture

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 12:42:10 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2104 Re: More References in Mass Culture


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 11:35:57 -0500
Subject: 10.2104 Re: More References in Mass Culture
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.2104 Re: More References in Mass Culture

There's an episode of the Nickelodeon cartoon Hey, Arnold from the third
season entitled "School Play."  Here's some information taken from their
website and the URL for those who want more:

When Helga hears that Arnold is Romeo in the school's production of
Romeo
and Juliet, she schemes to get the part of Juliet, mainly because they
have
a kissing scene

http://www.netvista.net/~del_grande/arnold.html

cdf

C. David Frankel
Visiting Assistant Professor
  of Theatre/Academic Advisor
University of South Florida

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 12:42:10 -0500
Subject: 10.2104 Re: More References in Mass Culture
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2104 Re: More References in Mass Culture

Are you sure that isn't: "Julie et so much pasta....?"

>Krusty: Here's another one! Knock, knock, who's there? Juliet. Juliet
>who? Juliet who ate so much pasta, Romeo doesn't want her anymore!

First Folios (again)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2106  Wednesday, 1 December 1999.

From:           Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Nov 1999 12:45:17 -0500
Subject:        First Folios (again)

I know I'm very late on this one, and I understand that none of the
facsimiles is in fact an equivalent of a real authentic First Folio.

However, I was quite excited to find a reasonably priced copy (I think
it is the Yale version) in a used bookstore.  If I understood most of
the previous discussion, it seemed to focus on if any of these
facsimiles actually reproduced an actual first folio, but I wasn't clear
on the objection to using an idealized version.  Given the unlikelyhood
of finding an authentic First Folio in a used bookstore, I was trying to
understand the objection to using the facsimile to get an understanding
of what the first published version looked like.  Particular concerns
with the Yale version are of interest to me as well.

Jimmy

Re: Iago's Name


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2230  Thursday, 16 December 1999.

[1]     From:   Lawrence Manley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Dec 1999 15:25:47 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2213 Iago's Name

[2]     From:   Elena Fernandez del Valle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Dec 1999 18:36:11 -0600
        Subj:   Iago, the Spanish Connection

[3]     From:   Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Dec 1999 20:01:13 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2213 Iago's Name


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lawrence Manley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Dec 1999 15:25:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.2213 Iago's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2213 Iago's Name

Just to follow up on the remarks about Santiago by John Drakakis and
Sean Lawrence: There are some good pages on Iago, Santiago, and the
Moors' legendary extraction of an annual tribute of 100 virgins [as
reported in Edward Daunce's Brief Discourse of the Spanish State
(1590)], in Lena Cowen Orlin's Private Matters and Public Culture in
Post Reformation England. Orlin cites previous work by B. N. Murphy, "A
Note on Iago's Name," in Literature and Society, ed. Bernice Slote
(1964), and Barbara Everett, Young Hamlet (1989).

Lawrence Manley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elena Fernandez del Valle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Dec 1999 18:36:11 -0600
Subject:        Iago, the Spanish Connection

"Iago" derives from the Latin "Iacobus", not from any Islamic sources.
"Sanctus Iacobus", the patron saint of Spain, became "Sanct Iago" and
"Santiago", called "Santiago Matamoros" (Saint James the Moorslayer)
under whose advocacy were chased from Spain the Arabs.

According to legend, Saint James brought the Christian faith to Spain
and was buried in the place which later became Santiago de Compostela.
"Santiago y cierra España" was the battle cry of the Spaniards, and the
Orden de Santiago the main military order of the kingdom (Any additional
information from Spanish contributors to SHAKSPER?).

In Cinthio's novella, the only character who has a name is "Disdemona".
The Iago  character is referred to as "lo scellerato alfieri" (the
Italian text is at www.ecu.edu/medieval/moor.htm), but never addressed
by name -so maybe Shakespeare did chose Iago's name. The Spanish
connection is suggested too by Iago's use of a Spanish word in 2.3, 144
"Who's that who rings the bell?  Diablo, ho!"

And then, Othello kills himself with a "sword of Spain"...

Elena Mariné

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Dec 1999 20:01:13 -0800
Subject: 10.2213 Iago's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2213 Iago's Name

Santiago was the "hero" who led the crusades against the Moors? What a
nice protection against any protest. Of course, a Catholic Iago (James)
nursing plots against innocent people who trusted him to be what he said
he was (Protestant, in the case of James I) was so uncomfortable that a
smart James would not have noticed the resemblance at all. Particularly
since he was a newbie.

 

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