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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Productions of Much Ado
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1900  Friday, 5 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Al Cacicedo <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 13:14:24 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1893 Re: Productions of Much Ado

[2]     From:   Tom Bishop <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 13:55:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1896 RE: SHK 10.1883 Re: Productions of Much Ado

[3]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 19:43:28 -0000
        Subj:   RE: Productions of Much Ado

[4]     From:   Alan Dessen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 14:46:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1893 Re: Productions of Much Ado


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 13:14:24 -0500
Subject: 10.1893 Re: Productions of Much Ado
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1893 Re: Productions of Much Ado

That's true enough--but as a tactic for wedded bliss it seems to me to
fall a tad short for Beatrice as for Hero.--Al Cacicedo

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 13:55:04 -0500
Subject: 10.1896 RE: SHK 10.1883 Re: Productions of Much Ado
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1896 RE: SHK 10.1883 Re: Productions of Much Ado

John Drakakis refers to the "simple fact" (the what? I hear the cries,
but down, wantons, down) of the appearance of the words "Innogen his
wife" in two early scenes of the Q and F1 texts of "Much Ado".  As some
will recall John and I a few years back rehearsed in laborious detail
various arguments about what those few inky marks on those old pages may
mean. It was a pretty thorough go-round. Interested parties may like to
consult the record in the SHAKSPER archives, to save John going through
it all again.

Tom

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 19:43:28 -0000
Subject:        RE: Productions of Much Ado

John Drakakis writes

>I'm a little surprised by Paul Swanson's comment that Innogen "may or
>may not be a character" in Much Ado.  I draw his attention to the simple
>fact that in Q1 (1600) her name appears twice in the head titles of two
>early scenes. She's there all right.  The question is: what is she doing
>there? and what does her presence in these scenes contribute to the
>meanings that we generate?

By this logic Edmund is there on the Dover cliff with Gloucester,
because the Pied Bull quarto of King Lear tells us so. If you insist on
Innogen's presence you have to accept Edmund's presence, and so the
questions are: what is he doing there? and what does his presence in
this scene contribute to the meanings that we generate?

Gabriel Egan

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Dessen <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Nov 1999 14:46:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.1893 Re: Productions of Much Ado
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1893 Re: Productions of Much Ado

>In defense of Benedick, the tactic of shutting off inconvenient
>conversation with a kiss was earlier suggested by Beatrice, to Hero, in
>connection with Claudio.
>
>Dana (Shilling)

In defense of Benedick, the line in question ("Peace, I will stop your
mouth") is Leonato's in both Quarto and Folio.  Giving the line to
Benedick started with Theobald in the early 18th century and, with few
exceptions, has been part of the editorial tradition ever since.

Alan Dessen
 

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