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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: 20th Century Poetry
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1902  Friday, 5 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Manuela Rossini <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 Nov 1999 21:04:33 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1894 20th Century Poetry

[2]     From:   Syd Kasten <
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        Date:   Friday, 5 Nov 1999 14:01:29 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1894 20th Century Poetry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Manuela Rossini <
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Date:           Thursday, 04 Nov 1999 21:04:33 +0100
Subject: 10.1894 20th Century Poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1894 20th Century Poetry

Dear Ellen Lawrence

One poetic revision of the father-daughter relationship in KING LEAR I
know of is Adrienne Rich's poem "After Dark", to be found in the
collection NECESSITIES OF LIFE (1966). Rich uses the metaphor of the
prison to describe the speaker's relationship to her father. The desired
escape from the paternal fetters is expressed in her line: "Now let's
away FROM prison" (cp. Sh's LEAR: away TO prison).

I'm sorry for not being able to send you the whole text right now.

Can you let me/us know the name of the painter in exchange?

Thanks,
Manuela Rossini

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 5 Nov 1999 14:01:29 +0200 (IST)
Subject: 10.1894 20th Century Poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1894 20th Century Poetry

I don't  remember Allen Ginsberg acknowledging debt to or offering
homage to Shakespeare.  (which doesn't mean that he didn't)

Ginsberg, Allen (1926-1997), American poet, regarded as the spokesman
for the Beat Generation of the 1950s. Born in Newark, New Jersey,
Ginsberg was educated at Columbia University. During his time in New
York City he met Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs, who would later
become integral members of the Beat movement. After graduating from
Columbia in 1948, Ginsberg worked at various jobs before moving to San
Francisco in the early 1950s. There he met American poets such as
Kenneth Rexroth, Gary Snyder, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Ferlinghetti's
bookstore, City Lights, published Ginsberg's first book, Howl (1956).
Howl was initially seized by the government under obscenity charges, but
the charges eventually were dropped, and the book is now recognized as
the first important poem of the Beat movement. An angry indictment of
America's false hopes and broken promises, Howl uses vivid images and
long, overflowing lines to illuminate Ginsberg's thoughts. Howl and
Ginsberg's subsequent poetry show the influence of English poet William
Blake (who Ginsberg claimed once spoke to him in a vision) and American
poets Walt Whitman and William Carlos Williams.  Ginsberg's poetry is
informal, discursive, and often repetitive. Its immediacy, honesty, and
explicit sexual subject matter frequently give it an improvised quality.

"Ginsberg, Allen," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 98 Encyclopedia. (c)
1993-1997
Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
 

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