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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Audio Recordings
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1932  Wednesday, 10 November 1999.

[1]     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 13:22:33 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1920 Re: Burton's Coriolanus

[2]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 13:42:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1920 Re: Burton's Coriolanus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 13:22:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.1920 Re: Burton's Coriolanus
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1920 Re: Burton's Coriolanus

Gielgud's "Winter's Tale" for Caedmon features George Rose as
Autolycus.  I would argue that Rose's performance is every bit as good
in its way as Gielgud's.  The young Alan Bates is a credible and
passionate Florizel and Peggy Ashcroft is Paulina.  This is a remarkable
recording that brings the play fully to life.  Here's a question I have
often pondered-and haven't found an answer yet.  How does one make the
silent Imogen work on an audio recording of Much Ado?  Give her
sounds-alla Lavinia?  David Richman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 13:42:40 -0500
Subject: 10.1920 Re: Burton's Coriolanus
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1920 Re: Burton's Coriolanus

"Another remarkable Caedmon set, with a sensational performance that
completely transcends the fact that it's *just an audio recording* is
The Winter's Tale with John Gielgud,"

Heresy though it may be to the full production ideal, recording or radio
on demand has many advantages: concentration on the language,
inflection, vocal range: better sets in the mind's eye than any scenic
artist could devise: the face and figure of the less familiar voices and
characters as imagination paints them. Radio and recordings provide
intimacy, flexibility, casts who are not usually available at the same
time

Let's hear it for the record.

Mary Jane
 

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