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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: 20th Century Poetry
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1936  Wednesday, 10 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Martin Jukovsky <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 15:43:25 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1918 Re: 20th Century Poetry

[2]     From:   Lucia Anna Setari <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 16:12:31 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1918 Re: 20th Century Poetry


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Jukovsky <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 15:43:25 -0500
Subject: 10.1918 Re: 20th Century Poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1918 Re: 20th Century Poetry

Don't forget Carl Sandburg's "They All Want to Play Hamlet."  You can
read it at
<http://geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/2012/poems/sandb04.html>.

Martin Jukovsky
Cambridge, Mass.


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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lucia Anna Setari <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 Nov 1999 16:12:31 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 10.1918 Re: 20th Century Poetry
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1918 Re: 20th Century Poetry

The Italian poet Pier Paolo Pasolini (who, by the way, wrote a poem
entitled "Poema per un verso di Shakespeare" in which he quotes "What
you know you know. From this time forth I never will speak word" from
Othello, and, as a director, made a short film, entitled "Che cosa sono
le nuvole", about Othello ) more than once used Shakespearean lines or
motives in his poems.

To me, he seems, though indirectly, to refer to King Lear in his last
poems, as in the last of them, "Un saluto e un augurio" (A Farewell and
a Wish), in which he says that he will go unburdened toward the death,
leaving life's fardel to younger people; or, perhaps, even in other
poems of the same time, in which he ironically calls himself "a new kind
of Fool", for telling uncomfortable truths.

Lucia Anna S.
 

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