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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Seeking the Skinny
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1949  Thursday, 11 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Jeffrey Myers <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Nov 1999 13:01:28 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 10.1934 Seeking the Skinny (Hamlet, that is)

[2]     From:   Scott Oldenburg <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Nov 1999 16:07:30 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1934 Seeking the Skinny (Hamlet, that is)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeffrey Myers <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Nov 1999 13:01:28 -0500
Subject: 10.1934 Seeking the Skinny (Hamlet, that is)
Comment:        RE: SHK 10.1934 Seeking the Skinny (Hamlet, that is)

>If the readership had to pick a single book or essay which pithily
>summarized every theory about Hamlet, notably his psychology, reasons
>for his supposed "inaction", and if possible the nature of the "sea
>change", I'd be most appreciative.

"You must borrow me Gargantua's mouth first."  That said, however, I've
always thought Rosalie Colie's chapter on Hamlet in _Shakespeare's
Living Art_ is particularly useful on the specific issues you mention.

Jeff Myers

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Oldenburg <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Nov 1999 16:07:30 -0700
Subject: 10.1934 Seeking the Skinny (Hamlet, that is)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1934 Seeking the Skinny (Hamlet, that is)

For a great summary of pre-1970s psychological interpretations of
_Hamlet_, I can think of no better book than Norman Holland's
_Psycho-Analysis_and_Shakespeare_, now out-of-print but available in
most university libraries.

The book (or at the very least pages 269-274) may also be of interest to
the person who posted on the idea of Caliban and Ariel as manifestations
of Prospero's psyche in _The_Tempest_.

All the best,
Scott Oldenburg
 

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