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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Curative Waters
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1984  Monday, 15 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Matthew C. Hansen <
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        Date:   Saturday, 13 Nov 1999 01:57:17 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1975 Re: Curative Waters

[2]     From:   Werner Broennimann <
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        Date:   Saturday, 13 Nov 1999 14:24:21 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 10.1947 Curative Waters

[3]     From:   Martin Green <
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        Date:   Saturday, 13 Nov 1999 16:30:29 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1975 Re: Curative Waters


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew C. Hansen <
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Date:           Saturday, 13 Nov 1999 01:57:17 -0600
Subject: 10.1975 Re: Curative Waters
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1975 Re: Curative Waters

>What I am  after is any skinny about Elizabethan belief in the therapeutic value of
>ocean, sea, air water so forth. Is there any passage along these lines
>in Shakespeare that comes to mind. Music for sure-but I have a dim
>apprehension that sea and waves as agents of healing must be there,
>somewhere...
>
>best hr greenberg md endit

It seems that there is something of this in Ferdinand's lines from The
Tempest:

FERDINAND

       Where should this music be? i' the air or the earth?
       It sounds no more: and sure, it waits upon
       Some god o' the island. Sitting on a bank,
       Weeping again the king my father's wreck,
       This music crept by me upon the waters,
       Allaying both their fury and my passion
       With its sweet air: thence I have follow'd it,
       Or it hath drawn me rather. But 'tis gone.
       No, it begins again.

His sitting on the bank, watching the waters-his tears full salt and all
that is something of a curative.  Not that he has much place else to
seek solace on a desert island.

Matthew C. Hansen
Graduate Teaching Fellow
University of Nebraska - Lincoln

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <
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Date:           Saturday, 13 Nov 1999 14:24:21 +0000
Subject: Curative Waters
Comment:        SHK 10.1947 Curative Waters

Have a look at Spenser's The Faerie Queene, I.11.30, referring to the
curative powers of the well of life:

For unto life the dead it could restore,
And guilt of sinful crimes cleane wash away,
Those that with sicknesse were infected sore,
It could recure, and aged long decay
Renew, as one were borne that very day.
Both Silo this, and Iordan did excell,
And th'English Bath, and eke the german Spau,
Ne can Cephise, nor Hebrus match this well:
Into the same the knight backe overthrowne, fell.

Personally I prefer Vals in the Grisons (Switzerland) to wash away
sinful crimes, although my friend and list member Markus Marti will
probably root for Leukerbad to seek catharsis from a lifetime habit of
fancying figures in apocryphal books.

Werner

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Green <
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Date:           Saturday, 13 Nov 1999 16:30:29 -0500
Subject: 10.1975 Re: Curative Waters
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1975 Re: Curative Waters

Shakespeare's Sonnets 153 and 154, both in the main translations of an
epigram in the Greek Anthology, but each with a different ending not in
the original Greek, deal with the curative powers of a certain bath (but
not  with ocean waters). The endings Shakespeare supplied state, in
slightly different ways, that the baths cannot cure the malady of love
(which many commentators on the Sonnets suggest should be interpreted
literally as well as figuratively).  This is discussed in many  articles
and books; see especially James Hutton's writings  on the Greek
Anthology-also my own "Wriothesley's Roses, etc.," pp 69-77.
 

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