Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Age of Awareness
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2046  Monday, 22 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 19 Nov 1999 10:14:02 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2026 Re: Age of Awareness

[2]     From:   Meg Powers Livingston <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 19 Nov 1999 21:46:37 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Age of Awareness

[3]     From:   Reg Grouse <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 22 Nov 1999 11:53:21 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2026 Re: Age of Awareness


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 19 Nov 1999 10:14:02 -0800
Subject: 10.2026 Re: Age of Awareness
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2026 Re: Age of Awareness

Terence claims that Geralyn,

>effectively abandons meaning and offers mere 'sound patterns' as an
>acceptable substitute for it. Dangerous romantic nonsense. This is to
>reduce Shakespeare to the level of Dylan Thomas. Fie!

Actually, Geralyn draws attention to the words, which are the foundation
of meaning.  And the proposal doesn't suggest never learning what the
words mean, but learning them interactively, by trying out guesses.
Nor, we might add, has sound nothing to do with meaning.

I'm glad you brought this up, because it made me look at Geralyn's
proposal a little more closely.  It reminds me, a bit, of getting actors
"off book" before working through the rehearsal and interpretation
process.  It's that much easier to interpret something you can carry
around in your brain than something that's on the page.  I seem to
recall that certain medieval theologians had volumnious memories, but it
didn't stand in the way of a rigorous interpretive process.  Memoria may
be closer to inventio then we tend to think, and memory is aided by
sound.

Cheers,
Se

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.