1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2079  Thursday, 29 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 10:35:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2040 War & Lechery

[2]     From:   Manuela Rossini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 18:53:31 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2074 Re: War & Lechery

[3]     From:   Friedman Michael <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 20:47:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2074 Re: War & Lechery


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 10:35:31 -0500
Subject: 10.2040 War & Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2040 War & Lechery

Enter Autolycus singing.

[. . . . ]
The lark, that tirra-lyra chants,
With heigh! with heigh! the thrush and the jay,
Are summer songs for me and aunts,
While we lie tumbling in the hay.  IV.iii.9-12

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Manuela Rossini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 18:53:31 +0100
Subject: 10.2074 Re: War & Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2074 Re: War & Lechery

Dear Dana Shilling:

The question "How many men did Joan sleep with?" is as irrelevant as the
number of Lady Macbeth's off-spring. We are dealing with texts here. As
such, Joan's portrayal in 1H6 is a further instance of the innumerable
cultural representations in the Christian world that either elevate
women to the saintly status of the virgin or to the equally excessive
position of the whore. The play constructs precisely this either-or
reality for the heroine. Feminism has dismantled both stereotypes in
order to reveal that they are predominantly misogynist projections of
male desires and anxieties that ignore female individuality. From my
feminist perspective then, the scene in which Joan mentions the name of
potential fathers shows that she is denied the sense of self
increasingly granted to male characters in early modern drama. Female
subjectivity is sacrificed to the flames - scapegoating male lechery
perhaps? I know that things are more complex, that women have the same
sexual appetites as men and that presentations of male sexuality are in
bad need of revision too, still: A Joan!

Manuela Rossini

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Friedman Michael <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 20:47:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.2074 Re: War & Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2074 Re: War & Lechery

Since nobody else has offered him, I'll propose Lucio from MFM as a
clearly lecherous character.  He is a frequenter of the brothel of
Mistress Overdone, and he impregnates Kate Keep-down, then abandons her.
Wouldn't that qualify?

Michael Friedman
University of Scranton

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