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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Luhrman's R+J
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2082  Monday, 29 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 10:18:56 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2071 Re: Luhrman's R+J

[2]     From:   Mark Neidorff <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 16:56:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: R+J

[3]     From:   Alexander Houck <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 16:50:40 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2071 Re: Luhrman's R+J

[4]     From:   Judy Lewis <
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        Date:   Saturday, 27 Nov 1999 17:48:41 +1300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2059 Re: Luhrman's R+J


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 24 Nov 1999 10:18:56 -0800
Subject: 10.2071 Re: Luhrman's R+J
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2071 Re: Luhrman's R+J

Vince Locke writes:

>What did me in was
>the bizarre MTV/John Woo/West Side Story direction and editing, the
>comical freeze frames when new characters entered while their names and
>relationships to R+J flashed on the screen, and the stupid accents.

I'm not sure if these identifications were designed to be comical.  I
seem to recall a similar device being used in The Good, the Bad and the
Ugly and other rather good spaghetti westerns.  I rather enjoyed it, but
then again, I like John Woo, but I can see how the business of the
opening scenes or the film as a whole could be annoying.  I'd just like
to point out how the quietness of certain scenes between Romeo and
Juliet seem to contrast with the crazed energy of their setting.

Cheers,
Se

 

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