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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: November ::
Re: Lechery
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2096  Tuesday, 30 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1999 10:19:18 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Lechery and Lucio

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 29 Nov 1999 17:20:34 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2079 Re: War & Lechery


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1999 10:19:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Lechery and Lucio

Mike Friedman's observation that Lucio is a "lech" is a good one that is
often missed.  This is because Lucio is a "hail-fellow-well-met" type
who, at first, we have some affection for.  After all, he does want to
save Claudio's life and seems like a good friend to both Isabella and
her brother. But there is another side to Lucio, as Mike points out, he
is irresponsible in his sexual life, and he also uses lower-class women.

Is this true of the Duke as well?  I suspect that Harry Berger would say
"Yes." Others, of course, would hotly dispute this conclusion.

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 29 Nov 1999 17:20:34 -0500
Subject: 10.2079 Re: War & Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2079 Re: War & Lechery

Manuela Rossini writes:

"The question 'How many men did Joan sleep with?' is as irrelevant as
the number of Lady Macbeth's off-spring. We are dealing with texts here.
...  The play constructs precisely this either-or reality for the
heroine."

If a play that has NO agency can construct a reality, then surely Joan
can have intercourse with as many men as she wishes, and the number may
tell us something about her (as a literary character, not as a real
woman).

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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