1999

The Top 100

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2004  Tuesday, 16 November 1999.

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 1999 17:49:23 +1000
Subject:        The Top 100

I thought some list members might get a (masochistic?) kick out of this.
Amazon.com apparently did some kind of poll, asking for the "top 100
books of the millenium."  Or they may have just used their sales
records- unsurprisingly, there is no detail about their polling methods.
The results are about what you might expect: a truly bizarre compendium.
However, Shakespeare did make the cut (sort of).  The Random House
complete works came in at #16, and the Signet Hamlet came in at #17
(beaten in the rankings by not one, but two Ayn Rand titles).   What is
truly enlightening, however, is to go to the "read more" section and go
through the reader comments.  Some touching, some appalling, some just
scary.  Here's my favorite, from the Hamlet reader reviews:

"Hamlet and his family have lived in Denmark. They stay in a castle at
Elsinore. A short distance on the estate is an orchard with cool shade.
The time is the afternoon. The king leaves to get some rest in the
orchard. Time passes, and he does not return. The family becomes
worried. Someone goes to the orchard and finds the king. The rumor is
that he has been killed by a poisonous snake. A madness has fallen on
Hamlet. Thus the deceased king's apparition is clearly seen and heard.
For a time members of the family and others detect Hamlet's queer
demeanor. As time passes, it is seen more frequently. It sounds as
though he spent much of his salad days with the jester. A reader is not
as easily mousetrapped as other readers about Hamlet's motives. The
historical record shows that Emperor Claudius was poisoned by his wife
so that her son, Nero, would inherit a throne. "

Despite the above, the reader did give Hamlet five stars.

Those not faint of heart may find more such perspectives at:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/subst/features/c/century/millennium-books-1-25.html/102-6677764-0005667

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

Re: Curative Waters

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2003  Tuesday, 16 November 1999.

From:           H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 15 Nov 1999 14:42:04 EST
Subject: 10.1984 Re: Curative Waters
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1984 Re: Curative Waters

Thanks to all for this post. HRGreenberg mD ENDIT.

Apocryphal Gospels

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2001  Tuesday, 16 November 1999.

From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 15 Nov 1999 14:47:06 -0600
Subject:        Apocryphal Gospels

Sorry Mike Jensen for being slow to answer your query about "gnostic
gospels".  I have been away from the computer and my library for a few
days.

The best known apocryphal gospel in the late Middle Ages was the *Gospel
of Nicodemus* or as it was called in Latin, the Gesta Pilati.  The fact
that it was translated into Middle English Verse is prob.  responsible
for its widespread influence on the drama.  York, Chester and Wakefield
all draw on it for the harrowing of hell sequences and for some
legendary material about the Crucifixion and its immediate aftermath as
well.  My knowledge of apocryphal gospels  is at second hand; suggest
you start with Rosemary Woolf  *The English Mystery Plays*.  U of Calif.
Pr., 1972.  See index s.v. gospels.  Also Hardin Craig's English
Religious Drama of the Middle Ages   Oxford: Clarendon 1955/1960. s.v.
Gospel of Nicodemus.   There are other sources, prob.  V.A. Kolve, The
Play Called Corpus Christi Stanford U.P. ca. 1965, but I cannot find my
copy just now. The two sources I cite above are only concerned with
Nicodemus/Gesta Pilati.  There were other gospels current in the M.A.
and taken seriously.  I remember titles like *Joseph the Carpenter* ,
The Girlhood of Mary, The Life of the Boy Jesus, etc.  but do not
remember just where I read about them when studying medieval drama 35
years ago.  The influence is said to be indirect in some cases, as the
Stanzaic Life of Christ and the Legenda Aurea both owe something to the
apocryphal gospels and these two sources doubtless contributed to the
drama.

I expect you can do better than this, but this will get you started.

Cheers for apocrypha,
John

Re: Something Scary

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2002  Tuesday, 16 November 1999.

From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 1999 00:49:29 +0000
Subject: Something Scary
Comment:        SHK 10.1991 Something Scary

I wonder if Hamlet the Musical is scarier than Otello the Opera? Or
Hamlet the ballet? Or 'My Private Idaho' as history play?

Interesting point: did serious lovers of Dickens find 'Oliver!' the Bart
musical, as scary then? Is the only way we can deal with desperation by
guying it? I really don't know what the answer is here.

Shakespeare in the Toilet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2000  Tuesday, 16 November 1999.

[Editor's Note: With this post, SHAKSPER reaches YK2 for the first time
in its history. Never in a single year of its ten-years have there been
as many separate digests as this. Believe it or not the postings below
were the very next in line in my mailbox. I did not pre-select the
subject to mark this occasion, but a smile came to my face when I
realized that SHK 10.2000 would be labeled Shakespeare in the Toilet.
Here's hoping that this digest does not cause the end of the world to
your hard drives, and thanks for the memorable years, Hardy]

[1]     From:   F. Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 15 Nov 1999 15:24:44 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare in the Toilet

[2]     From:   Jerry Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Nov 1999 07:38:50 -0600
        Subj:   From Yahoo News


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           F. Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 15 Nov 1999 15:24:44 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare in the Toilet

A colleague in our Political Science department shared this news item
with me:

Shakespeare in the Toilet

LONDON (Reuters) - A British theater company is putting on a run of
plays in an old Victorian toilet. The Bog Standard Theatre Company spent
three years and $6,475 converting the facilities into a 12-seat venue
with a tiny stage in the western English town of Malvern.

``Shakespeare said all the world's a stage so I guess that includes
toilets,'' the troupe's Dennis Neale told the Sun tabloid.

``Ironically we don't have room for a loo the audience have to run
across the road to public ones.''

Cheers,
Nick Clary

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 16 Nov 1999 07:38:50 -0600
Subject:        From Yahoo News

UK Shakespeare troupe finds odd stage for the bard

LONDON, Nov 15 - A British theatre company is putting on a run of
Shakespeare's plays in an old Victorian toilet.

The Bog Standard Theatre Company spent three years and 4,000 pounds
($6,475) converting the facilities into a 12-seat venue with a tiny
stage in the western English town of Malvern.

"Shakespeare said all the world's a stage so I guess that includes
toilets," the troupe's Dennis Neale told the Sun tabloid.

"Ironically we don't have room for a loo -- the audience have to run
across the road to public ones."

----------------------------------------------------------------
Should we discuss what would be an appropriate repertoire?

Jerry Bangham
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://www.win.net/~kudzu/

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