1999

Re: Burgundy and France

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2064  Tuesday, 23 November 1999.

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 Nov 1999 17:41:54 -0500
Subject: 10.2047 Re: Burgundy and France
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2047 Re: Burgundy and France

Pervez Rizvi indicates some of the possibilities confronting an editor,
and I'd like to point out some other possibilities.

First, the Oxford Textual Companion accepts the hypothesis that The
Tragedy of King Lear  (F) is Shakespeare's revision of The History of
King Lear (Q1). If we accept that "France" is a mistake for "Burgundy,"
then Shakespeare (apparently) made the same mistake twice, once in his
first draft, and then again in his revision.

But if the Oxford editors are correct (Companion 529), Shakespeare's
initial manuscript (his foul papers) was used to set the first quarto,
while a copy of the first quarto was used by Shakespeare for this
initial revision.  This marked up copy of Q1 was then the basis for
manuscript B (a prompt-book of the revision, or, as the Oxford editors
call it, a redaction).  This manuscript (B) was then used to mark up a
copy of Q2, which was then used as copy for setting the First Folio.
(Whew!)

So these two playbooks (original and revision) were read and/or copied
by various early seventeenth century professions: the playhouse
bookkeeper, perhaps two press correctors, two compositors, possibly an
independent scribe or two, plus, of course, our playwright.

Now, one might argue, for example, that the hypothetical change from
"Burgundy" to "France" was made by the compositor who set the line in
Q1, and that this mistake was simply not noticed by the corrector of the
press, Shakespeare, the bookkeeper, and/or any other interested person.

Or, one might argue that Shakespeare wrote "France" (and meant to write
"France") and that no other early seventeenth person who read the line
apparently thought it unusual enough to "correct." On the other hand,
the Enter Gloster and Edmund stage direction (Q) is changed (corrected,
if you wish) to Enter Gloucester, and Edgar in F.

In any case, I find that Duthie and Wilson (old Cambridge edition)
anticipate my suggestion that "compliment" is "sarcastic." They cite
1.2.23 where Gloucester says that France parted in choler-which can also
be construed as ammunition for Professor Wells' position!

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Age of Awareness

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2063  Tuesday, 23 November 1999.

From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 Nov 1999 13:18:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Age of Awareness
Comment:        SHK 10.2046 Re: Age of Awareness

Reg Grouse writes,

'the seductive beauty of his verse  . . . that musical, abstract quality
which needs no intellectual but only an emotional response'

It's precisely the distinction you presuppose between an 'intellectual'
and an 'emotional response' that strikes me as dangerous as well as
mistaken.  Language is not music. It has a vital discursive dimension in
which the intellect is intricately and irrevocably involved. 'Sound
patterns' may aid and abet that dimension, but they can scarcely be
separated from or substituted for it. Nor are they in themselves
admirable. They occur randomly in the telephone directory as readily as
in the works of the Bard.  Something which is 'only an emotional
response' to language is not an adequate response at all, and we have no
business encouraging it in children. Pop songs will do that for us. I
repeat, Fie!

T. Hawkes

Re: War & Lechery

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2061  Tuesday, 23 November 1999.

From:           Patrick Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 Nov 1999 11:45:26 -0600
Subject: 10.2040 War & Lechery
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2040 War & Lechery

My guess is that Gloucester in King Lear can be taken as promiscuous.
The way that he speaks about his bastard's begetting has always struck
me as the bluff false shame of a man who prides himself on a varied
sexual life.  Of course, he pays for his sport with his
psychoanalytically interesting eyeballs. But his sexuality also strikes
me as preferable to that of his son, who exploits the sisters through
it.

I've just graded a bunch of papers for my Renaissance class. None, or
very few, of my students would call Angelo a "victim" at the end of MfM
and several are aggrieved about his fate. While he is deceived, he gets
an apparently first-rate wife out of the deal. If this is victimization,
they're all for it. Why use that word?

Pat Dolan

Re: Winters Tale and the Bear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2062  Tuesday, 23 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 Nov 1999 17:59:41 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 10.2021 Re: Winters Tale and the Bear

[2]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 22 Nov 1999 15:23:04 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2043 Re: Winters Tale and the Bear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 Nov 1999 17:59:41 +0000
Subject: Re: Winters Tale and the Bear
Comment:        SHK 10.2021 Re: Winters Tale and the Bear

Ingeborg Boltz has the following footnote in her bilingual edition of
The Winter's Tale (Englisch-deutsche Studienausgabe der Dramen
Shakespeares, T


Summer Acting Programs?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2060  Tuesday, 23 November 1999.

From:           Shane Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 Nov 1999 11:07:26 -0600
Subject:        Summer Acting Programs?

I saw Jim Helsinger's message posted last Friday re: the Orlando
festival.  I am wondering if anyone on the list can help me, though it's
not specific to Shakespeare.  A friend of mine from Europe will be
spending this coming summer in the states.  While he is here he would
like to participate in acting workshops or internships, preferably on
the east coast.  Does anyone have any information about universities,
theaters or acting programs that offer internships and/or workshops for
the summer months?   He will be here, as I mentioned, all summer and
would like to emerge himself in studying theater.  I'm not concerned
with tuition costs at the moment, I'm simply trying to find programs,
compile the info for him and let him sift out the ones he finds most
interesting.

To any members who feel that this list is an inapproriate place for
posting this message, I apologize in advance.  To avoid unnecessary
e-mail to those individuals, any responses may be directed to me
off-list at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thank you,
Shane Mueller

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