1999

"Gnostic" Gospels

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2024  Friday, 19 November 1999.

From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 11:05:17 -0600
Subject:        "Gnostic" Gospels

For those interested in the apocryphal gospels in medieval drama.  It
was not I who introduced the term "gnostic gospels" into the
discussion.  Indeed I, like Mike Jensen, am puzzled by the term in
context, and I looked about for the connection between the Gospel of
Nicodemus and other apocrypha in the 14th and 15th centuries and
gnosticism.  Did not find any.  I believe I first encountered the
putative connection in a Mike Jensen letter.

Yours for the pursuit of apocryphal knowledge,
John Velz

New Business Book

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2023  Friday, 19 November 1999.

From:           Ron Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 12:03:46 -0500
Subject:        New Business Book

There was a segment on CNBC's financial news show this morning about a
new book, SHAKESPEARE IN CHARGE. The author, Kenneth Adelman, takes
passages from Shakespeare to illustrate lessons for business leaders.
Various business news anchors appeared in period garb playing the roles
as Adelman explained their relevance to business situations! There's a
"Claudius Crisis Page" at http://www.shakespeareincharge.com/

Re: Winters Tale and the Bear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2021  Friday, 19 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 10:45:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2007 Re: Winters Tale and the Bear

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 18:52:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1998 Winters Tale and the Bear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 10:45:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.2007 Re: Winters Tale and the Bear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2007 Re: Winters Tale and the Bear

I don't dispute Melissa Aaron's account that invokes white bear suits,
but there *are* two other bear sightings in stage directions of the
period:

bear:  the animal pursues a figure in three plays: "Exit pursued by a
bear" (Winter's Tale, 1500, 3.3.58), "Enter a Nymph, pursued by a wild
Bear" (Conspiracy, D3v; see also Mucedorus, A3v); in Mucedorus the
consequences are shown: "Enter Mucedorus like a shepherd with a sword
drawn and a bear's head in his hand" (A3v, also C2r); see also Locrine,
4-5.  [from *A Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama,
1580-1642*]

The Locrine reference is from a dumb show that involves "a Lion running
after a Bear or any other beast"; Henry Killigrew's The Conspiracy was
published in 1638.

Alan Dessen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 18:52:31 -0500
Subject: 10.1998 Winters Tale and the Bear
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1998 Winters Tale and the Bear

It seems that this debate goes back to  *Mucedorus* itself:

Nay, sure, it cannot be a bear, but some devil in a bear's doublet, for
a bear could never have had that agility

Despite what Riverside says, and until I get a chance to read the other
evidence, I don't see how this line can have any point unless it's a
joke about a guy in a bear suit.  I suppose it could be calling
attention to a particularly talented trained bear, but it reminds me of
the double(t) entendres about boys dressed like girls dressed like
boys.  In other words, the dramatic irony plays one way to the
characters, for whom it is an agile bear, and another for the audience
for whom it's a devil in a bear's doublet.

So here's a public recantation.  If the King's Men had recourse to a
bear suit for Muc, it makes little sense to me that they would switch to
a live bear for Winter's Tale. Consequently, although I was attracted by
the idea of powerful dramatic effect produced by a live ferocious animal
drooling on the groundlings, for the moment I see Antigonus pursued by a
devil in a bear's doublet.

Winters have long tales and bears have short, but methinks this tale
hath no bear of any sort.

Clifford Stetner

Re: Something Scary

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2022  Friday, 19 November 1999.

[1]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 10:21:43 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

[2]     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 11:56:46 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 13:15:49 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

[4]     From:   Jim Helsinger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 18 Nov 1999 00:15:27 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 10:21:43 -0600
Subject: 10.2008 Re: Something Scary
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

<Or 'My Private Idaho' as history play?>

What is REALLY scary is the above "his-story"--is--at least it is not
mine.

Threads of Henry V in Idaho are as hard to come by as the Hogg daughters
in the annals of Texas history-Ima Hogg, Ura Hogg, and-I forget.  And
the Hogg daughters are legitimate historical facts.

Maybe we should consult the actual garment industry in NYC for
forthcoming details of the never-merge--or Pokemon himself.

Judy Craig

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 11:56:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 10.2008 Re: Something Scary
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

Hamlet the Musical is reminding me of Simon Brett's satiric dream of
staging Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer as the musical Lumpkin!.  What
is it that we think we may gain by translating a work of art from one
medium into another?  I think a singing Hamlet would be harder to
comprehend than a talking one, though perhaps a singing Gertrude might
be more meaningful to the SHAKSPER-ers who trashed her earlier.  I've
always found Gertrude psychologically accessible as a woman whom death
has pushed into denial, one of the early stages of grief.  She doesn't
live long enough to get past it.

Helen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 13:15:49 -0500
Subject: 10.2008 Re: Something Scary
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

Didn't Verdi try to adapt Hamlet for opera and give up in utter
frustration?

There is a story about Donald Wolfert, the early 20th Century
actor-manager (the pattern for Sir in "The Dresser"), who was having a
dram in his club and was engaged in conversation by a leading ballet
dancer.  The ballet guy told Wolfert that he might be interested in
attending a forthcoming performance of the Hamlet ballet, in which he
(ballet guy) was going to have the lead.  Wolfert in horror asked, "you
mean you are going to DANCE Hamlet?"  The response was "Why not, Donald,
you've been singing him for years."

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Helsinger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 18 Nov 1999 00:15:27 EST
Subject: 10.2008 Re: Something Scary
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2008 Re: Something Scary

Although my first thought at any play-"The Musical!" is usually a
mixture of horror and laughter, I must say that I saw a play, I believe
called, "Hamlet, The Musical" in Atlanta at the Theatrical Outfit about
ten years ago and it was great.  I was actually on tour with the Alabama
Shakespeare Festival doing Hamlet at the time, and we went simply for
the curiosity.  We all had a great time!  What a surprise.

Also, American Stage in St. Petersburg Florida usually stages a musical
version of a Shakespeare play outdoors each Spring.  It usually gets
great reviews and huge attendance. I saw their version of Macbeth
several years ago and, yes, I loved it.  I admit that I only went
because a close friend of mine was going and as we drove over we laughed
over the possible songs of "Out, Out Damned Spot" and "Double, Double."
In less than five minutes I was hooked.  It was very well done.

The musical can be a very powerful form of both drama and comedy.  I say
this as someone who rarely, if ever, attends them and has not produced
or acted in one for many, many years.   I certainly cannot vouch for
"Hamlet, The Musical" now playing in Prague, but who knows?  Maybe it's
great.

Jim Helsinger
Artistic Director
Orlando-UCF Shakespeare Festival
www.shakespearefest.org

Re: Age of Awareness

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.2020  Friday, 19 November 1999.

From:           David J. Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 17 Nov 1999 09:18:35 -0600
Subject: 10.1997 Age of Awareness
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1997 Age of Awareness

There is an extremely active group in Madison called the Young Madison
Players who perform Shakespeare uncut.  Ages range from 7-17, with a
large number of players in the younger age-group.  This year they have
done productions of Julius Caesar, Cymbeline, Romeo and Juliet, and a
workshop of extracts from the plays.  They are doing Measure for Measure
and Richard II early next year and have in the past done Lear, Hamlet,
Henry IV, Henry V, Macbeth, and As You Like It, among others.  The Romeo
and Juliet production in the summer had six different casts, Cymbeline
three!  My son, aged 10, has loved the experience.  The directors,
Richard and Anne di Palma have been doing this for twenty years, and it
is quite clear to me that there are no limits to the capacity of young
children to perform Shakespeare with enthusiasm and understanding.
Richard provides each actor with tapes of his/her part which explain
every line and its significance in the play as a whole. It's an
astonishing and salutary project for academics.

David Schalkwyk

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.