1999

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1701  Thursday, 7 October 1999.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 06 Oct 1999 11:33:10 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1690 Much Ado and "Good Men"

[2]     From:   Chris Stroffolino <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 7 Oct 1999 02:20:45 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1690 Much Ado and "Good Men"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 06 Oct 1999 11:33:10 -0700
Subject: 10.1690 Much Ado and "Good Men"
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1690 Much Ado and "Good Men"

Paul Swanson writes:

Dogberry also calls God a "good man" in 3.5.  The point I would take
from this is that being a good man is fundamental to Dogberry's whole
world view.  After all, he seems to have lost almost everything else.

This declaration, by the way, comes in the context of his silencing
Verges, who's about to tell Leonato about the gulling of Claudio, and in
the midst of an incoherent, but largely self-aggrandizing monologue,
placing himself above Verges.  Perhaps the really important distinction
is between being good, in the social terms of being considered 'true' or
defending one's honour, and doing good, such as running an effective
night-watch service or defending Hero.  We might add that those who
spend time "being good" are mainly self-interested, concerned with their
own aristocratic reputation or minor state functions, while those who
"do good" help others.  But that's just hypothetical.

Cheers,
Se 

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