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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: October ::
Re: The Curtain
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1746  Friday, 15 October 1999.

[1]     From:   Brian Haylett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Oct 1999 14:47:47 +0100
        Subj:   Re: The Curtain

[2]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Oct 1999 13:55:26 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 10.1735 Q: The Curtain


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Haylett <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Oct 1999 14:47:47 +0100
Subject:        Re: The Curtain

>If the projecting stage of the Globe and other theaters of Shakespeare's
>time were curtainless, why was a contemporary theater named "the
>Curtain"?  How were curtains associated with stagecraft in the popular
>mind?

A curtain wall is part of the structure of various medieval
fortifications.  The word 'curtain' was later used for other walls
encircling enclosures. The Curtain Theatre may have been built close to
either kind of site, or the name may refer to the wall around the
Theatre itself.

Dedicated followers of Leslie Hotson may not accept your initial
assumption, of course.

Brian Haylett
Caister-on-Sea

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Oct 1999 13:55:26 -0400
Subject: Q: The Curtain
Comment:        SHK 10.1735 Q: The Curtain

>If the projecting stage of the Globe and other theaters of Shakespeare's
>time were curtainless, why was a contemporary theater named "the
>Curtain"?

According to Boyce and Schoenbaum the name refers to the neighborhood,
Curtain Close.  A M Nagler, in "Shakespeare's Stage," says it comes from
the Italian "cortina," an enclosure-which may be a way of saying the
same thing.  Charles Norman, though, suggest it comes from "a curtain (a
species of battlement) in the city wall."
 

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