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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: October ::
Associated University Presses New Releases
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1786  Thursday, 21 October 1999.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Thursday, October 21, 1999
Subject:        Associated University Presses New Releases

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Tuesday, I got a mailing from Associated University Presses about some
new releases. To my pleasure, I noted that many were by SHAKSPEReans,
related to recent discussions on SHAKSPER, or of general interest to the
SHAKSPER membership, so I am reproducing below the descriptions of

* ITALIAN STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES, Edited by
MICHELE MARRAPODI and GIORGIO MELCHIORI

* TEXTUAL FORMATIONS AND REFORMATIONS, Edited by LAURIE E. MAGUIRE and
THOMAS L. BERGER

* BIBLICAL REFERENCES IN SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS, by NASEEB SHAHEEN

* SHAKESPEARE: The Two Traditions, by H. R. COURSEN


************
ITALIAN STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES

Edited by MICHELE MARRAPODI and GIORGIO MELCHIORI

The papers collected in this volume set out to present some significant
Italian contributions to Shakespeare studies that, scattered through a
number of publications not available outside Italy, might have escaped
the attention they deserve. They are representative, though by no means
exhaustively, of approaches to Shakespeare and his contemporaries In
Italy, and may convey a sense of the vitality and extreme variety of
critical and scholarly attitudes In this field.

Contents:

Introduction: Shakespeare Studies in Italy Since 1964, by MICHELE
MARRAPODI
With a Postscript by GIORGIO MELCHIOR[

Part One: Theory and Practice
A Midsummer Night's Dream as an Example of 31 Shakespeare's Specularity,
by MARGELLO PAGNINI
Bonds of Love and Death in The Merchant of Venice, by ALLESANDRO
SERPIERI
The Interdiction of Eroticism in Shakespeare's Histories, FERNANDO
FERRARA
Shakespeare's Discursive Strategies and Their Definitions of
Subjectivity, ANGELA LOCATELLI

Part Two: Theme and Culture
In a Time of Unrest: A Role for the Theater in Measure for Measure, by
VITO AMORUSO
Shakespeare's Uncultured Caesar on the Elizabethan Stage, by CLAUDIA
CORTI
Shakespeare's History Plays as a 'Scene' of the Disappearance of Popular
Discourse, LAURA DI MICHELE
"Now I play a merchant's part": The Space of the Merchant in
Shakespeare's Early Comedies, by  MARIANGELA TEMPERA
Three Kings, Herod of Jewry, and a Child: Apocalypse and Infinity of the
World in Antony and Cleopatra, by GILBERTO SACERDOTI

Part Three: Language and Ideology
A National Idiom and Other Languages: Notes on Elizabethan Ambivalence
with Examples from Shakespeare,  VANNA GENTILI
"But thou didst understand me by my signs": The Instability of Signs in
King John, by ROBERTA MULLINI
"Let her witness it: The Rhetoric of Desdemona, by MICHELE MARRAPODI
"Great mischiefs mask in expected pleasures": The Rhetoric of
Expectation and the Rhetoric of Surprise in English Baroque Theater,
FRANCO MARENCO
From Shakespeare to Dryden: Three Dramatic Incipits, by VIOLA PAPETTI
Bibliography
Index

About the Editors: MICHELE MARRAPODI is Associate Professor of English
and Acting Professor of History of English Theater at the Family of
Arts, University of Palermo. He is Associate Editor of Cahiers
Elisabethains and Assistant Editor of Seventeenth-Century News. GIORGIO
MELCHIORI, CBE, FBA, is Professor Emeritus of English, University Roma
Tre. He is Life-Trustee of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and
Honorary Trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation.

304 pages       Bibliography, Notes, Index      $45.00

ISBN 0-87413-666-0      LC 98-36115     CIP

**********
TEXTUAL FORMATIONS AND REFORMATIONS

Edited by LAURIE E. MAGUIRE and THOMAS L. BERGER

This volume analyzes the development of textual theory and practice in
the twentieth century, questioning not just the assumptions and
methodologies of textual study but the very genesis of textual study and
current definitions of the field. Each contributor tackles a specific
theoretical or practical issue in essays that cover feminist practice,
editorial procedure, political ideology, practical dramaturgy, and
sixteenth- and twentieth-century history. The result is a volume at once
wide-ranging and detailed, of interest and value to cultural historians
as well as to textual scholars.

Contents

Introduction, LAURIE E. MAGUIRE

Part I: Narratives and the New Bibliography
Authentic Reproductions: The Material Origins of the New Bibliography,
JOSEPH L. LOEWENSTEIN
Touring and the Construction of Shakespeare Textual Criticism, PAUL
WERSTINE
Greene's Orlando: W. W. Greg Furioso, MICHAEL WARREN

Part II: Interrogatives
The Monsters and the Textual Critics, TOM DAVIS
How Farre is't called to Soris? Or, Where was Mr. Hobbs when Charles II
died?, A. R. BRAUNMULLER
The Problem of Shakespeare's Text(s), BARBARA A. MOWAT
Shakespeare's Most Neglected Play, RICHARD PROUDFOOT

Part III: Contents
Marriage and Divorce in 1613: Elizabeth Cary, Frances Howard, and
Others, JEANNE ADDISON ROBERTS
The Sexual Politics of Textual Transmission, VALERIE WAYNE
"Killed with Hard Opinions": Oldcastle, Falstaff, and the Reformed Text
of I Henry IV, DAVID SCOTT KASTAN

Part IV: Readings
Character Identification in Two Folio Plays, Coriolanus and All's Well:
A Theater Perspective, CHARLES B. LOWER
The Taming of a Shrew and the Theories; or "Though this be badness, yet
there is method in't", STEPHEN MILLER
Looking for Cousin Ferdinand: The Value of F1 Stage Directions for a
Production of The Taming of the Shrew, RALPH ALAN COHEN

Bibliography
Index

About the Editors: LAURIE E. MAGUIRE is Associate Professor of English
at the University of Ottawa in Canada. THOMAS L. BERGER is Piskor
Professor of English Literature at St. Lawrence University, where-he has
taught

312 pages       Bibliography, Notes, Index      $47.50

ISBN 0-87413-655-5      LC 97-38849     CIP

*********
BIBLICAL REFERENCES IN SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS

NASEEB SHAHEEN

The hundreds of biblical references In Shakespeare's plays give ample
evidence that he was well acquainted with Scripture. Not only Is the
range of his biblical references Impressive, but also the aptness with
which he makes them. Hamlet and Othello each have more than fifty
biblical references. No study of Shakespeare's plays Is complete that
Ignores Shakespeare's use of Scripture.

The Bibles that Shakespeare knew, however, were not those that are in
use today. By the time the King James Bible appeared in 1611,
Shakespeare's career was all but over, and the Anglican liturgy that is
evident in his plays is likewise one that few persons are acquainted
with.

This, volume provides a comprehensive survey of the English Bibles of
Shakespeare's day, notes their similarities and differences, and
indicates which version the playwright knew best. The biblical
references in each of Shakespeare's plays are then carefully analyzed,
as are Shakespeare's references to the Prayer Book and the homilies. The
thorny question of what constitutes a valid biblical reference is also
discussed.

This study of Shakespeare's biblical references is unique in two
respects. First, it is not based on secondary sources. The author owns
one of the world's largest collections of early English Bibles, which
includes over one hundred copies of the Geneva Bible, in addition to
numerous editions of other bibles, prayer books, and books of homilies
of Shakespeare's day. His study of Shakespeare's biblical references is
based on these primary sources.

Next, this study is unique in that it examines Shakespeare's references
in light of his secular sources. To be of real worth, a study of
Shakespeare's biblical references should not only list those references,
but should enable the reader to determine which references Shakespeare
borrowed from his plot sources and which he added from his own memory as
part of his design for the play. The author has therefore studied every
source that Shakespeare is known to have read or consulted before
writing each play and has examined the biblical references in those
sources. Then he points out which biblical references in his literary
sources Shakespeare accepted, and how he adapted them in his plays. This
information is especially valuable when assessing the theological
meanings that are sometimes imposed on his plays, meanings that often go
beyond what Shakespeare intended or what his audience must have
understood.

This study combines the material from the authors three previous volumes
dealing with Shakespeare's biblical references in the tragedies,
histories, and comedies, published by the University of Delaware Press
in 1987, 1989, and 1993 respectively. Those volumes have been thoroughly
revised, and to them has been added an analysis of the biblical
references in Shakespeare's final plays, including The Two Noble Kinsmen
and the Sir Thomas More fragment.

Biblical References in Shakespeare's Plays is considerably broader in
scope than any other study of its kind and provides the scholarly checks
and balances in dealing with the subject that previous studies lacked.

About the Author: Naseeb Shaheen is a native of Chicago, Illinois. He
received his B. A. from the American University of Beirut and his M.A.
and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is
now Professor of English Literature at the University of Memphis and has
published numerous works on Shakespeare, Spencer, and Milton. As a
result of his research into Shakespeare's biblical references, he owns
one of the worlds largest collections of early English Bibles that
includes more than one hundred copies of the Geneva Bible in addition to
numerous editions of other pre-King James Bibles.

880 pages       Appendix, Bibliography, Index   $49.50
ISBN 0-87413-677-6              LC 98-8306      CIP

**********
SHAKESPEARE: The Two Traditions

H. R. COURSEN

The purpose of this book Is to examine recent productions of Shakespeare
on stage and film and to lay out some Interpretive guidelines for
responding to the scripts as recreated In these two very different
formats and within the conflicted environment of shifting critical
paradigms. The two traditions-Shakespeare on stage and Shakespeare on
film-have experienced a mid-air collision with post-modernism. The
results are beginning to be chronicled.

This book draws distinctions between the two sites of production and
between the nature of our experience of "Shakespeare" on stage and on
film. As we move toward a new millennium, stage involves a negotiation
between "traditional" productions, which, however faithful to the text
and the spoken word, can be dull re-productions, and "postmodemist"
interpretations, which can render whatever the script is trying to do
incoherent it-as the word compete with isolated effects and a frenzied,
carnivalesque atmosphere.

After almost one hundred years of Shakespeare on film, film has suddenly
become a more popular site for the plays than at any time since the
advent of sound. The book deals with film as genre, arguing that words
are not as important when it comes to film as the basic action the film
recreates from the script. Here, action is archetype. The book examines
in detail all of the Shakespeare films released in the U.S. in 1995 and
1996. It ends with an analysis of Kenneth Branagh's full-length Hamlet.

Specifically, in the section on stage productions, the book looks at
recent successful efforts in Washington and New York to produce the
history plays in ways that, at once, evoke the issues the plays explore
and communicate those issues to a late-twentieth-century audience. The
productions examined are those in 1995 and 1996 of Henry V and Henry VI.
The book looks at three versions of The Tempest Royal Shakespeare
Company (1994), American Repertory Theater (Massachusetts, 1995), and
Public Theater (New York, 1995), the latter with Patrick Stewart. Also
examined are two Hamlets, the relatively successful version in New York,
with Ralph Fiennes, and a less effective production in Chicago in 1996,
in which the play was presented but not interpreted.

The book looks at some of the excellent recent films, like Nunn's
Twelfth Night, which makes the issue of gender central to our experience
of the film; Luhrmann's vivid Romeo and Juliet, and Pacino's delightful
documentary Looking for Richard', at entertaining offshoots like
Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead and Branagh's A
Midwinter's Tale; and at other less successful recent attempts at
translation to film.

The book does not say where Shakespeare is going, but it does show,
through the many and varied versions of the plays presented here where
Shakespeare has been recently.

About the Author: H. R. Coursen was born in New Jersey, attended Amherst
College, Wesleyan University, and The University of Connecticut. He has
taught at Newark Academy, N.J., the Choate School, Bowdoin College,
Washington and Jefferson College, The University of London, Clemson
University, The Globe Centre, and currently teaches at the University of
Maine (Augusta) and at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. He has
published eleven books on Shakespeare, the most recent being Shakespeare
in Production: Whose History?, seven novels, and nineteen books of
poetry, including New and Collect Poems in 1996 and Songs and Seasons in
1997.

272 pages       Bibliography, Notes, Index      $42.50

ISBN 0-8386-37744       LC 98-23511     CIP
 

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