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Home :: Archive :: 1999 :: October ::
Re: Paraphrasing the Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 10.1791  Thursday, 21 October 1999.

[1]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Oct 1999 16:48:36 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Oct 1999 20:52:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets

[3]     From:   Karen Peterson-Kranz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 21:51:18 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets

[4]     From:   Heidi Webb Arnold <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 08:51:38 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.1779  Paraphrasing the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Oct 1999 16:48:36 -0400
Subject: 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets

>I know this is the kind of query that scholars rightly abhor,

The "unscholarly" cyber discussion group on Usenet,

humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare

has been reading, paraphrasing, and commenting on a sonnet a week for
some time-we are now up to #118, I think.

You can retrieve these discussions from archives, DejaNews: though
someone else will have to give you the specifics of the process.

I haven't done such a search myself.

Geralyn Horton, Playwright
Newton, Mass. 02460
http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Oct 1999 20:52:43 -0400
Subject: 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets

The web is getting pretty good for primary texts, but outside of a few
journal articles, criticism is still woefully lacking.

http://library.utoronto.ca/www/utel/ret/shakespeare/1609inti.html

gives some commentary and textual analysis

http://library.utoronto.ca/www/utel/ret/shakespeare/1609.html

gives a small bit of textual analysis

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
C.W. Post College

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 21:51:18 +1000
Subject: 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1779 Paraphrasing the Sonnets

Well...I don't know how close these are to what you're looking for, but
they're interesting sites.

http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/furness/poems/index.html

and

http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/collections/furness/

These are part of the University of Pennsylvania's CETI (Center for
Electronic Texts and Images) project.  They are beautiful sites.  They
don't really have paraphrases, but there's other interesting
textually-oriented material, and a good essay by Margreta de Grazia on
the 1640 Benson edition of the sonnets, which is depicted page-by-page
on the site.  The second has a selection of the plays (not all) with
source/chronicle information, teaching ideas and the like.

http://library.utoronto.ca/www/utel/ret/shakespeare/1609inti.html

This is a marvelous site created largely by SHAKPER's own Hardy Cook.
There's a good bibliography and useful appendices on themes, word
frequency, etc.  The sonnets themselves are in old-spelling form,
following the 1609 Quarto.

[Editor's Note: Thanks for the compliment, but the edition is a result
of a complete, five-year collaboration with Ian Lancashire. -Hardy]

http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/ -- aka "Mr. William Shakespeare
on the Internet"

If there's anyplace online where you'll find a link to sonnet summaries,
I would expect to find it here.  And if you're still looking, check out
http://vos.ucsb.edu/shuttle/eng-ren.html-Alan Liu's unbelievable Voice
of the Shuttle, for English Renaissance, with lots of links.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz
Dept. of English & Applied Linguistics
University of Guam

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Heidi Webb Arnold <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Oct 1999 08:51:38 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 10.1779  Paraphrasing the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.1779  Paraphrasing the Sonnets

Mr. Nourpanah,

This is just my opinion, but in answer to your question about books
available on the sonnets, I think those books are evil, you are better
off without criticism on sonnets.  The critics write about poems and
turn the poems into unrecognizable sludge.  They want to make poems into
things they are not.   No one in many American classes even reads the
poems at all.  Students read the criticism and talk about what the
critics said and when they do that they pretend to know everything about
the poem, when they've never really read it.  Critics hate poetry.  I
know that critics are smarter and more sophisticated than I am but that
is still what I think.

If you want to know more about the sonnets, I think, just my opinion and
I'm from a poor rural area so that's very different from Tehran or
anyplace overseas, if you read the poem, and say the words, you can feel
the light from the poem's heart come into your room.  You might notice
that at the sonnet's turn, the poet can stand up and gather the sonnet's
images into his hands.

I am glad for you that you don't have books of criticism where you
live.

Best,
Heidi
 

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